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Salvia apiana - Jeps.
                 
Common Name White Sage, Compact white sage
Family Lamiaceae or Labiatae
USDA hardiness 7-10
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Dry benches and slopes below 1500 metres[71].
Range South-western N. America - California.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Frost Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Full sun

Summary

Salvia apiana White Sage, Compact white sage


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Stan_Shebs
Salvia apiana White Sage, Compact white sage
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Stan_Shebs
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of flower
Salvia apiana is a PERENNIAL growing to 3 m (9ft 10in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8. It is in flower from Apr to July. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.It is noted for attracting wildlife.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Synonyms

Habitats
 Cultivated Beds; South Wall. By. West Wall. By.
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Seed;  Stem.
Edible Uses: Condiment;  Drink.

Seed - raw or cooked. It can be ground into a powder and used as a mush[177, 257]. The seed has been mixed with cereals such as oats or wheat, toasted then ground into a fine powder and eaten dry[257]. The seed can also be soaked overnight and used as a drink in water or fruit juice or eaten with cereals[61, 183]. The seed is also used as a spice[105]. The leaves are used in cooking[183]. They can be used as a flavouring in seed mushes[257]. Stem tops[105, 177]. The young stalks can be eaten raw[257]. Ripe stem tops can be peeled and eaten raw[257].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Blood tonic;  Ophthalmic.

An infusion of the leaves is used as a blood tonic and as a treatment for coughs and colds[257]. The leaves can be eaten, or used as a sweat bath, in the treatment of colds[257]. The seeds have been used as eye cleaners[257]. No more information is given here, but in other instances the seed has been placed in the eye, it then forms a gelatinous covering to which any foreign matter in the eye adheres. The seed is washed out of the eye by the eyes own tears[K].
Other Uses
Hair;  Incense.

The leaves have been crushed in water and used as a hair shampoo, dye and hair straightener[257]. A poultice of the freshly crushed leaves can be applied to the armpits to treat body odours[257]. The leaves have been burnt as an incense to fumigate a house after a case of contagious disease such as measles[257].
Cultivation details
Requires a very well-drained light sandy soil in a sunny position[200]. Prefers a rich soil[1]. Plants grow best in a dry climate and can be killed by excessive winter wet[200, 260]. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c[200]. The seed is sold in health food shops for its use in making a drink[183]. A good bee plant[61]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233].
Propagation
Seed - sow March/April in a greenhouse[200]. Germination usually takes place within 2 weeks. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in early summer. In areas where the plant is towards the limits of its hardiness, it is best to grow the plants on in a greenhouse for their first winter and plant them out in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood succeed at almost any time in the growing season[200].
Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Cistus salviifoliusRock Rose, Salvia cistus, Sage Leaf Rock Rose10
Salvia ballotaeflora 10
Salvia carduaceaThistle Sage20
Salvia carnosaPurple Sage12
Salvia clevelandiiBlue Sage, Fragrant sage, Chaparral Sage10
Salvia columbariaeChia, Ziegler's sage32
Salvia elegansPineapple Sage, Pineapple-scented Sage,10
Salvia fruticosaGreek Sage, Greek oregano23
Salvia glabrescens 10
Salvia glutinosaJupiter's Distaff, Sticky Sage10
Salvia hispanicaMexican Chia, Chia30
Salvia japonica 10
Salvia lanata 11
Salvia lanigeraWrinkle-Leaved Sage10
Salvia lavandulifoliaSpanish Sage23
Salvia lyrataCancer Weed, Lyreleaf Sage02
Salvia melliferaCalifornian Black Sage12
Salvia microphyllaBlackcurrant Sage22
Salvia moorcroftiana 11
Salvia multicaulis 10
Salvia multiorrhizaDan Shen03
Salvia officinalisSage, Kitchen sage, Small Leaf Sage, Garden Sage35
Salvia plebeia 11
Salvia pomiferaApple Sage22
Salvia pratensisMeadow Clary, Introduced sage10
Salvia reflexaMintweed, Lanceleaf sage10
Salvia sclareaClary, Europe sage, Clary Sage22
Salvia stachyoides 10
Salvia sylvestrisBalkan Clary, Woodland sage10
12
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Expert comment
 
Author
Jeps.
Botanical References
71200
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
RONI Mon Nov 28 2005
THIS IS A GOOD WEB SITE AND IT GAVE ME ALOT OF INFO ON WHITE SAGE FOR MY PROGECT. THX
Elizabeth H.
Victor Hartford Thu Mar 23 2006

White Sage seeds & plants organic Salvia apiana Seed source, cultivation, uses

Elizabeth H.
Marc Fri Sep 14 2007
Sorry to be rude, but "sow March/April in a greenhouse[200]. Germination usually takes place within 2 weeks." isn't very useful information. The USDA suggests heating to 150 F for twn minutes, some sites suggest "liquid smoke", others gibberellic acid. A number of places suggest light is necessary for germination. So it would very much help if you would be specific as to germination temperatures, sowing depth, what specific growing medium is best and what stratification techniques are necessary. Thanks
Elizabeth H.
salvio Fri Sep 12 2008
To Marc: sprouting is very easy. Just bury 1/2 to 1 inch (2-3cm) in sandy soil and water until a good size (2-5 pars of leaves grown) and transplant to bigger pot or ground.
Elizabeth H.
david n Wed May 27 2009
The leaves taste rather like Sage (Salvia officinalis) but more intense, they are probably too tough to use without being chopped up unless you sont mind chewing. It looks good, almost white leaves.
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Subject : Salvia apiana  

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