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Rosa gallica - L.
                 
Common Name French Rose
Family Rosaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards There is a layer of hairs around the seeds just beneath the flesh of the fruit. These hairs can cause irritation to the mouth and digestive tract if ingested.
Habitats Hedges and woods, usually on calcareous soils[100].
Range S. and C. Europe.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary

Rosa gallica French Rose


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Redoute_-_Rosa_gallica_pontiana.jpg
Rosa gallica French Rose
biolib.de
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of shrub
Rosa gallica is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2 m (6ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Aug to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms

Habitats
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Flowers.
Edible Uses: Condiment.

Petals - raw or cooked. They can be added as a decorative garnish to salads[238], and can also be crystallised or preserved in syrup. They are also dried and used as a flavouring in tea, beverages, cakes etc[177, 183]. The dried petals and flower buds are an important ingredient in the Northern African spice mixture 'ras-el-hanout'[238]. Rose water, made by cold-infusing the petals, is used as a flavouring in various confections, especially 'Turkish Delight'[238]. The seed is a good source of vitamin E, it can be ground and mixed with flour or added to other foods as a supplement[102, 183]. Be sure to remove the seed hairs[102].
Medicinal Uses


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Antibacterial;  Aromatherapy;  Astringent;  Cancer;  Tonic.

The petals are antibacterial, astringent and tonic[4, 61]. They are taken internally in the treatment of colds, bronchial infections, gastritis, diarrhoea, depression and lethargy[238]. Externally, they are used to treat eye infections, sore throats, minor injuries and skin problems[238]. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers[214]. The essential oil from the flowers is used in aromatherapy to counter depression, anxiety and negative feelings[238].
Other Uses
Essential;  Pot-pourri.

An essential oil obtained from the flowers is used in perfumery[100], as an additive to bath water and in skin care preparations[238]. Rose water, made by a cold infusion of the petals, is also added to bath water and skin care preparations[238]. The dried petals and buds are used in pot-pourri[238].
Cultivation details
Succeeds in most soils[11], preferring a circumneutral soil and a sunny position[200]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Dislikes water-logged soils[200]. Grows well with alliums, parsley, mignonette and lupins[18, 20]. Garlic planted nearby can help protect the plant from disease and insect predation[18, 20]. Grows badly with boxwood[18]. A very ornamental plant[1], the flowers have a spicy fragrance[245]. It is cultivated for its essential oil in Eastern Europe[100]. There are some named varieties[200]. 'Officinalis' is the Apothecary's rose, it has been cultivated for its medicinal virtues[200]. Plants produce suckers[200]. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[80]. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus[200].
Propagation
Seed. Rose seed often takes two years to germinate. This is because it may need a warm spell of weather after a cold spell in order to mature the embryo and reduce the seedcoat[80]. One possible way to reduce this time is to scarify the seed and then place it for 2 - 3 weeks in damp peat at a temperature of 27 - 32°c (by which time the seed should have imbibed). It is then kept at 3°c for the next 4 months by which time it should be starting to germinate[80]. Alternatively, it is possible that seed harvested 'green' (when it is fully developed but before it has dried on the plant) and sown immediately will germinate in the late winter. This method has not as yet(1988) been fully tested[80]. Seed sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame sometimes germinates in spring though it may take 18 months. Stored seed can be sown as early in the year as possible and stratified for 6 weeks at 5°c[200]. It may take 2 years to germinate[200]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Plant out in the summer if the plants are more than 25cm tall, otherwise grow on in a cold frame for the winter and plant out in late spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July in a shaded frame. Overwinter the plants in the frame and plant out in late spring[78]. High percentage[78]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current seasons growth. Select pencil thick shoots in early autumn that are about 20 - 25cm long and plant them in a sheltered position outdoors or in a cold frame[78, 200]. The cuttings can take 12 months to establish but a high percentage of them normally succeed[78]. Division of suckers in the dormant season. Plant them out direct into their permanent positions. Layering. Takes 12 months[11].
Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
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Expert comment
 
Author
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Botanical References
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Links / References
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Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
david nicholls Tue May 30 2006
I believe a tea of R gallica officinalis may have helped dramatically with my stamina(I was using it a few years back), it seems possible if it is meant to be good for lethargy. I am rather frustrated by the small amount of info I can find about it on the net, aside from this site. It is pretty common in herbal teas for sleep and relaxation, strange,but not completely implausable that it should also be good for lethargy.
Elizabeth H.
david n Thu Jul 13 2006
I wonder if all the varieties are concidered to have medicinal virtues, it seems resonable to assume only officinalis is, I purchased something called officinalis but turned out to be "complicata" I woner if this confusion in common. I honestly think tea with offinalis gives a positive "rose tinted"glow to things, could easily be the placebo effect, something like that but it works every time.
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Subject : Rosa gallica  

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