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Ribes divaricatum - Douglas.
                 
Common Name Coastal Black Gooseberry, Spreading gooseberry, Parish's gooseberry, Straggly gooseberry
Family Grossulariaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Open woods, prairies and moist hillsides[60].
Range Western N. America.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary

Ribes divaricatum Coastal Black Gooseberry, Spreading gooseberry, Parish


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Wsiegmund
Ribes divaricatum Coastal Black Gooseberry, Spreading gooseberry, Parish
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Wsiegmund
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of shrub
Ribes divaricatum is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2.7 m (8ft 10in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 4 and is not frost tender. It is in flower in April, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms
Grossularia divaricata. Steud.

Habitats
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Fruit;  Leaves.
Edible Uses:

Fruit - raw or cooked[2, 3, 61, 118, 257]. Sweet and juicy[183]. A very acceptable flavour, though a bit on the acid side[K]. It is considered to be one of the finest wild N. American gooseberries[183]. The fruit is sometimes harvested before it is fully ripe and then cooked[256]. The fruit is about 10mm in diameter[200]. On the wild species the fruit can hang on the plant until the autumn (if the birds leave it alone)[K]. Young leaves and unripe fruits are used to make a sauce[183].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Miscellany;  TB;  VD.

The inner bark has been chewed, and the juice swallowed, as a treatment for colds and sore throats[257]. A decoction of the bark or the root has been used as an eye wash for sore eyes[257]. An infusion of the roots has been used in the treatment of sore throats, venereal disease and tuberculosis[257]. The burnt stems have been rubbed on neck sores[257].
Other Uses
Miscellany;  Needles;  String.

The roots have been boiled with cedar (Juniperus spp, Thuja sp.) and wild rose (Rosa spp) roots, then pounded and woven into rope[257]. The sharp thorns have been used as probes for boils, for removing splinters and for tattooing[257].
Cultivation details
Easily grown in a moisture retentive but well-drained loamy soil of at least moderate quality[11, 200]. Requires a very sunny position if it is to do well[11]. Plants are hardy to about -20°c[200]. This species is closely allied to R. rotundifolium[11]. Immune to mildew[101], this species is a parent of many mildew resistant hybrids and is being used in breeding programmes in Europe[200]. Plants can harbour a stage of white pine blister rust, so should not be grown in the vicinity of pine trees[155]. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus[200]. Sometimes cultivated for its edible fruit, there is at least one named variety[183].
Propagation
Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires 4 - 5 months cold stratification at between 0 to 9°c and should be sown as early in the year as possible[113, 164]. Under normal storage conditions the seed can remain viable for 17 years or more. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter, planting them out in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 10 - 15cm with a heel, July/August in a frame[78, 113]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, preferably with a heel of the previous year's growth, November to February in a cold frame or sheltered bed outdoors[78, 200].
Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Embelia ribesFalse black pepper, White-flowered Embelia34
Rheum ribes 20
Ribes aciculare 30
Ribes alpinumAlpine Currant30
Ribes altissimum 30
Ribes ambiguum 20
Ribes americanumAmerican Blackcurrant21
Ribes aureumGolden Currant41
Ribes bracteosumStink Currant21
Ribes burejense 40
Ribes californicumHillside Gooseberry20
Ribes cereumWax Currant21
Ribes curvatumGranite gooseberry30
Ribes cynosbatiDogberry, Eastern prickly gooseberry31
Ribes diacanthumSiberian currant20
Ribes distans 20
Ribes fasciculatum 10
Ribes fragrans 30
Ribes gayanum 30
Ribes glaciale 20
Ribes glandulosumSkunk Currant21
Ribes griffithii 20
Ribes himalense 31
Ribes hirtellumCurrant-Gooseberry, Hairystem gooseberry30
Ribes horridum 30
Ribes hudsonianumHudson Bay Currant, Northern black currant, Western black currant21
Ribes inebriansWhisky Currant21
Ribes inermeWhitestem Gooseberry, Klamath gooseberry20
Ribes irriguumIdaho Gooseberry21
123
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Expert comment
 
Author
Douglas.
Botanical References
1160200
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
MrsK Corfe Mon Oct 5 2009
Hello,early this year I purchased a black gooseberry bush from a lady, it has dark green leaves with a smooth stem, it has grown to a very healthy bush ,but has had no fruit this year, how should I prune for next year and hopefully some fruit I hope you can advise me, thank you for your time.
Pete O.
Dec 30 2011 12:00AM
My worcesterberry (Ribes divaricatum) has been growing succesfuly on a very difficult exposed, cold site where it has reaches -20C. Most plants in the area are also regularly eaten by fallow deer, however they hardly touch the worcesterberry. The shrub has managed to fruit prolifically for the past three years. The only difficulty with this been the harvesting as the plants are so spiky. The dark purple berries are incredibly sweet inside but have a sour skin. They are much enjoyed by my young two year old daughter, who tends to suck out the pulp and leave the skin. Our shrub has produced a good number of new plants where it has naturally layered itself. These have been dug up and replanted.
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Subject : Ribes divaricatum  

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