We have over 100,000 visitors each month, but in the whole of 2013 less than £1,000 was raised from donations. We rely on donations and cannot continue to maintain our database and website unless this increases considerably in 2014. Please make a donation today. More information on our financial position >>>
Search Page Content
   Bookmark and Share
   
    By donating to PFAF, you can help support and expand our activities
    Plant Suppliers: Click here for a List

Imperata cylindrica - (L.)Raeusch.                
                 
Common Name Cogongrass, Japanese Blood Grass
Family Poaceae or Gramineae
Synonyms I. arundinacea. Miscanthus arundinacea. Saccharum cylindricum.
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Open sandy habitats, usually by a river or the sea shore in Europe[50]. Commonly found on impoverished soils in Australia[193].
Range E. Asia - China, Japan, Korea.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Frost Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Full sun

Summary       
Form: Upright or erect.

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of flower
Imperata cylindrica is a PERENNIAL growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in) at a slow rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8 and is frost tender. It is in flower from Aug to September, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.

USDA hardiness zone : 6-9


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Imperata cylindrica Cogongrass, Japanese Blood Grass


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Brighterorange
Imperata cylindrica Cogongrass, Japanese Blood Grass
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Wie146
   
Habitats       
 Ground Cover; Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts: Flowers;  Leaves;  Root.
Edible Uses: Salt.

Young inflorescence and young shoots - cooked[177, 179]. Root - fibrous but pleasant to chew, containing starch and sugar[144, 177, 179]. Fairly sweet, the taste is sweetest in the wet season in Australia and worst from plants growing in sand[193]. The ash of the plant is used as a salt substitute[177].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Anthelmintic;  Antibacterial;  Antivinous;  Astringent;  Cancer;  Diuretic;  Emollient;  Febrifuge;  Restorative;  Sialagogue;  Styptic;  
Tonic.

The flowers and the roots are antibacterial, diuretic, febrifuge, sialagogue, styptic and tonic[147, 176, 178]. The flowers are used in the treatment of haemorrhages, wounds etc[218]. They are decocted and used to treat urinary tract infections, fevers, thirst etc[147, 218]. The root is astringent, antifebrile, antivinous, diuretic, emollient, haemostatic, restorative and tonic[218, 240]. It is used in the treatment of nose bleeds, haematuria, haematemesis, oedema and jaundice[176]. The root has antibacterial action against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus dysenteriae etc[176]. A decoction of the root is used as an anthelmintic and also to treat digestive disorders such as indigestion, diarrhoea and dysentery[272]. The root bark is febrifuge, restorative and tonic[218]. Extracts of the plant have shown viricidal and anticancer activity[218].
Other Uses
Paper;  Soil stabilization;  Stuffing;  Thatching;  Weaving.

The leaves are woven to make mats, bags and raincoats[46, 61, 193]. The inflorescences are valued for stuffing pillows and cushions[272]. The stems are used in thatching roofs[46, 61, 178, 272]. A fibre obtained from the leaves is used in making paper[46, 61, 154]. Can be planted on sandy soils to prevent erosion[154, 272]. The plants form impenetrably dense clumps and when planted close together in drifts make an excellent ground cover[200].
Cultivation details                                         
Landscape Uses:Alpine garden, Border, Massing, Rock garden, Specimen. Succeeds in ordinary garden soil in sun or partial shade[162, 187]. This species is only hardy in the southern part of Britain, tolerating temperatures down to about -15°c when dormant[187], though the young growth in spring can be damaged by late frosts. The var. I. cylindrica major. (Nees.)C.E.Hubb. is used medicinally in China[176] and as a wild food in Australia[193]. This species is quite closely related to sugar cane, it has been interbred experimentally with that species in India[193]. Plants grow away vigorously after a fire, often spreading freely to infest the burnt areas[144, 193]. Special Features:Attractive foliage, There are no flowers or blooms.
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - surface sow in spring in a greenhouse. The seed germinates quickly, prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring as the plant comes into growth. Division is very easy and can be carried out at almost any time in the year, though winter divisions are best potted up in the greenhouse and planted out in late spring[K].
Plant Suppliers: Click here for a List

      You can download this page as a PDF

Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
(L.)Raeusch.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
50200
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

  [K] Ken Fern Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.

[46]Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants.
An excellent and very comprehensive guide but it only gives very short descriptions of the uses without any details of how to utilize the plants. Not for the casual reader.
[50]? Flora Europaea
An immense work in 6 volumes (including the index). The standard reference flora for europe, it is very terse though and with very little extra information. Not for the casual reader.
[61]Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man.
Forget the sexist title, this is one of the best books on the subject. Lists a very extensive range of useful plants from around the world with very brief details of the uses. Not for the casual reader.
[144]Cribb. A. B. and J. W. Wild Food in Australia.
A very good pocket guide.
[147]? A Barefoot Doctors Manual.
A very readable herbal from China, combining some modern methods with traditional chinese methods.
[154]Ewart. A. J. Flora of Victoria.
A flora of eastern Australia, it is rather short on information that is useful to the plant project.
[162]Grounds. R. Ornamental Grasses.
Cultivation details of many of the grasses and bamboos. Well illustrated.
[176]Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas.
An excellent Chinese herbal giving information on over 500 species. Rather technical and probably best suited to the more accomplished user of herbs.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[178]Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica.
A translation of an ancient Chinese herbal. Fascinating.
[179]Reid. B. E. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao.
A translation of an ancient Chinese book on edible wild foods. Fascinating.
[187]Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Perennials Volumes 1 and 2.
Photographs of over 3,000 species and cultivars of ornamental plants together with brief cultivation notes, details of habitat etc.
[193]Low. T. Wild Food Plants of Australia.
Well presented, clear information and good photographs. An interesting read for the casual reader as well as the enthusiast
[200]Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.
[240]Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement).
Very terse details of medicinal uses of plants with a wide range of references and details of research into the plants chemistry. Not for the casual reader.
[272]Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal
Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.

Readers comment                                         
 
Elizabeth H.
Hari Kumar Shrestha Thu Apr 27 2006
Dear all, I have one querly i.e. about genes isolated from this Imperata cylindrica. Do anybody has this idea? Thanks! Hari
Elizabeth H.
Hari Kumar Shrestha Thu Apr 27 2006
Dear all, I have one query i.e. about genes isolated from this Imperata cylindrica. Do anybody has this idea? Thanks! Hari
Elizabeth H.
shobha Tue Jan 8 2008
shobha Can u please give me the abstrct related to antimicrobial activity of imerata cylindrica
Elizabeth H.
Steven Thu Apr 3 2008
dear all,can somebody tell me about the reproduction of this plant? *urgent* thanks
Elizabeth H.
JESSA Thu Jul 3 2008
GOOD EVE WHAT IS THE BIOACTIVE COMPOUND OF Imperata cylindrica AND CAN YOU SHOW US THE ABSTRACT ITS ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY.
Elizabeth H.
bina Sun Sep 13 2009
excuse me, can somebody tell me if it is possible to produce sugar from cogon grass?
Elizabeth H.
raven Sun Dec 27 2009
can some one tell me what subtance/s of imperata cylindrica can melt the kidney stoney or what subtance/s of imperata cylindrica that can help the a person that has an diabetes
Elizabeth H.
Aliena Tue Jan 12 2010
Yes, making sugar from cogon grass is possible. Same process with sugar cane.
QR Code

What's this?

This is a QR code (short for Quick Response) which gives fast-track access to our website pages. QR Codes are barcodes that can be read by mobile phone (smartphone) cameras. This QR Code is unique to this page. All plant pages have their own unique code. For more information about QR Codes click here.

1. Copy and print the QR code to a plant label, poster, book, website, magazines, newspaper etc and even t-shirts.
2. Smartphone users scan the QR Code which automatically takes them to the webpage the QR Code came from.
3. Smartphone users quickly have information on a plant directly for the pfaf.org website on their phone.
Rate This Plant                                         
Please rate this plants for how successful you have found it to be. You will need to be logged in to do this. Our intention is not to create a list of 'popular' plants but rather to highlight plants that may be rare and unusual and that have been found to be useful by website users. This hopefully will encourage more people to use plants that they possibly would not have considered before.
     
                                                                                 
Add a comment/link                                         

If you have important information about this plant that may help other users please add a comment or link below. Only comments or links that are felt to be directly relevant to a plant will be included. If you think a comment/link or information contained on this page is inaccurate or misleading we would welcome your feedback at admin@pfaf.org. If you have questions about a plant please use the Forum on this website as we do not have the resources to answer questions ourselves.

* Please note: the comments by website users are not necessarily those held by PFAF and may give misleading or inaccurate information.

Subject : Imperata cylindrica  
             

Links To add a link to another website with useful info add the details here
Name of Site
URL of Site
Details