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Glycine soja - Siebold.&Zucc.
                 
Common Name Wild Soya Bean
Family Fabaceae or Leguminosae
USDA hardiness 7-10
Known Hazards The raw mature seed is toxic and must be thoroughly cooked before being eaten[76]. The sprouted raw seed is sometimes eaten and is considered to be a wholesome food. Avoid prolonged treatment and with asthma and allergic rhinitis patients. Caution with breast cancer patients. Hypoproteinaemia possible in children with cystic fibrosis using soya milk. Women with oestrogen receptor positive tumours using soya protein supplements should excercise caution. Children severely allergic to cow's milk frequently sensitive to soy [301].
Habitats Lowland thickets, C. and S. Japan[58].
Range E. Asia - China.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Frost Hardy Moist Soil Full sun

Summary
UPDATE 24/4/2012: Glycine soja Siebold & Zucc. is a synonym of Glycine max subsp. soja (Siebold & Zucc.) H.Ohashi

Glycine soja Wild Soya Bean


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Dalgial
Glycine soja Wild Soya Bean
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Dalgial
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of flower
Glycine soja is a ANNUAL growing to 0.6 m (2ft).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8 and is frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.It can fix Nitrogen.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms
Glycine formosa Hosok. Glycine javanica Thunb. Glycine ussuriensis Regel & Maack

Habitats
 Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves;  Oil;  Oil;  Seed;  Seedpod.
Edible Uses: Coffee;  Milk;  Oil;  Oil.

Mature seed - cooked[2, 33]. Very rich in protein, the seeds can be eaten as they are in soups, stews etc[183], though they are very commonly used in the preparation of various meat substitutes[34, 46]. The dried seed can be ground into a flour and added to cereal flours or used for making noodles etc[183]. The Japanese make a powder from the roasted and ground seed, it is called 'Kinako' and has a nutty flavour and fragrance - it is used in many popular confections[183]. The sprouted seed is eaten raw or added to cooked dishes. The toasted seeds can be eaten as a peanut-like snack[183]. The seed is also made into numerous fermented foods such as miso and tempeh[183] and is also used to make soya milk, used in place of cow's milk. The seed contains 20% oil and 30 - 45% protein[100]. The immature seed is cooked and used like peas or eaten raw in salads[105, 183]. The strongly roasted and ground seeds are used as a coffee substitute[183]. The young seedpods are cooked and used like French beans[116, 183]. An edible oil is obtained from the seed. It is cooked or used as a dressing in salads etc[34, 183]. Young leaves - raw or cooked[179, 183].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antidote;  Astringent;  Diaphoretic;  Laxative;  Ophthalmic;  Resolvent;  Stomachic.

The fermented seed is weakly diaphoretic and stomachic[176]. It is used in the treatment of colds, fevers and headaches, insomnia, irritability and a stuffy sensation in the chest[176]. The bruised leaves are applied to snakebite[218]. The flowers are used in the treatment of blindness and opacity of the cornea[218]. The ashes of the stems are applied to granular haemorrhoids or fungus growths on the anus[218]. The immature seedpods are chewed to a pulp and applied to corneal and smallpox ulcers[218]. The seed is antidote[218]. It is considered to be specific for the healthy functioning of bowels, heart, kidney, liver and stomach[218]. The seed sprouts are constructive, laxative and resolvent[218]. They are used in the treatment of oedema, dysuria, chest fullness, decreased perspiration, the initial stages of flu and arthralgia[176]. A decoction of the bark is astringent[240]. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Glycine soja Wild Soya Bean for raised blood levels & cholesterol (see [302] for critics of commission E).
Other Uses
Oil;  Oil.

The seed contains up to 20% of an edible semi-drying oil[171]. It is non-drying according to another report[57]. This oil has a very wide range of applications and is commonly used in the chemical industry[171, 206]. It is used in making soap, plastics, paints etc[34, 46, 100].
Cultivation details
Requires a rich soil and a sunny position[33, 38]. Prefers a well-drained sandy soil[1]. Prefers a slightly acid soil[200, 206]. Does not grow well in a wet climate[132]. This is the wild ancestor of the cultivated soya bean and is of potential value as a genetic resource, especially when trying to breed for increased yields. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200]. Seed can be purchased that has been treated with this rhizobium, it is unnecessary on soils with a pH below 5.5 but can be helpful on other soils[206]. When removing plant remains at the end of the growing season, it is best to only remove the aerial parts of the plant, leaving the roots in the ground to decay and release their nitrogen.
Propagation
Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and then sow in early spring in a greenhouse. The seed should germinate within two weeks at a temperature between 12 - 16°c[206]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Seed can also be pre-soaked for 12 hours in warm water and then sown in situ in late spring, though this will not yield well unless the summer is very hot.

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Other Names
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Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Glycine maxSoya Bean42
Glycine tabacinaGlycine Pea, Glycine20
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Botanical References
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Subject : Glycine soja  

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