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Dipsacus sativus - (L.)Honck.                
                 
Common Name Fuller's Teasel, Indian teasel
Family Dipsacaceae
Synonyms D. fullonum sativus.
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Not known in a truly wild condition.
Range Of uncertain origin. An occasional escape from cultivation in Britain[17].
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full sun

Summary       

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of flower
Dipsacus sativus is a BIENNIAL/PERENNIAL growing to 1.8 m (6ft).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, self.The plant is self-fertile.
It is noted for attracting wildlife.


USDA hardiness zone : 4-8


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Dipsacus sativus Fuller


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Llez
Dipsacus sativus Fuller
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Llez
   
Habitats       
 Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses                                         
None known
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Cancer;  Diaphoretic;  Diuretic;  Homeopathy;  Stomachic;  Warts.

The root is diaphoretic, diuretic and stomachic[7]. An infusion is said to strengthen the stomach, create an appetite, remove obstructions of the liver and treat jaundice[4]. The root is harvested in early autumn and dried for later use[7]. The plant has a folk history of use in the treatment of cancer, an ointment made from the roots is used to treat warts, wens and whitlows[4, 218]. A homeopathic remedy is made from the flowering plant[7]. It is used in the treatment of skin diseases[7].
Other Uses
Brush;  Dye.

The dried flower heads are used for carding wool and as a clothes brush for raising the nap on woollen cloth[7, 46, 74, 169]. They are harvested with about 20cm of stem as soon as the flowers wither and are dried for later use[4]. A blue dye is obtained from the dried plant, an indigo substitute[74]. It is water soluble[74]. The colour is yellow when mixed with alum[148].
Cultivation details                                         
Succeeds in most soils[1] but prefers clay[17]. Prefers a deep rich soil[169]. Requires a sunny position[169]. A good butterfly plant[24]. Fuller's teasel is occasionally cultivated for its seed head, which is used for carding cloth[1, 2, 46]. The flowering heads are also much prized by flower arrangers because they keep their colour almost indefinitely when dried[7].
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - best sown in early spring in situ[115]. The seed can also be sown from February to May or from August to October. All but the earlier sowings can be made outdoors.
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
(L.)Honck.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
200
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

[1]F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956
Comprehensive listing of species and how to grow them. Somewhat outdated, it has been replaces in 1992 by a new dictionary (see [200]).
[2]Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World.
Lots of entries, quite a lot of information in most entries and references.
[4]Grieve. A Modern Herbal.
Not so modern (1930's?) but lots of information, mainly temperate plants.
[7]Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants.
Covers plants growing in Europe. Also gives other interesting information on the plants. Good photographs.
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[24]Baines. C. Making a Wildlife Garden.
Fairly good with lots of ideas about creating wildlife areas in the garden.
[46]Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants.
An excellent and very comprehensive guide but it only gives very short descriptions of the uses without any details of how to utilize the plants. Not for the casual reader.
[74]Komarov. V. L. Flora of the USSR.
An immense (25 or more large volumes) and not yet completed translation of the Russian flora. Full of information on plant uses and habitats but heavy going for casual readers.
[115]Johnson. C. P. The Useful Plants of Great Britain.
Written about a hundred years ago, but still a very good guide to the useful plants of Britain.
[148]Niebuhr. A. D. Herbs of Greece.
A pleasant little book about Greek herbs.
[169]Buchanan. R. A Weavers Garden.
Covers all aspects of growing your own clothes, from fibre plants to dyes.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.

Readers comment                                         
 
Elizabeth H.
Alan S. Raistrick Thu Jun 13 08:35:40 2002
I'm intrigued by you saying under Dipsacus sativus that it was used for carding wool. I've been back to the 12th century and I've not found any evidence of this. The actual textile use is for raising the nap on woollen cloth by fullers. The hooks on the flower heads make this possible. It seems a myth has arisen about carding because of possible misunderstandings of terminology. Apparently mediaeval latin writers forgot that the true fullers teasel was known as Dipsacus by the classical latin writers and started calling it Carduus, or thistle. If you actually have any evidence for this use other than a completely unsupported statement in Rita Buchanan's book [169] I'd love to hear about it.

Incidentally dear old Charley Linne got the name wrong and confused umpteen generations by calling the plant without hooks on its flowerhead Dipsacus fullonum, when it is quite useless for fullers

Elizabeth H.
Barney Levy Sun May 22 22:15:30 2005
I am researching the use of D.fullonum for california mission period carders. I am trying to see how they were made. Barney
Elizabeth H.
Jürgen Weber Sun Jun 22 2008

weberkarde und wilde Karden

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