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Ammi majus - L.                
                 
Common Name Bishop's Weed, Large bullwort, Queen Anne's Lace, Bishop's Flower
Family Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
Synonyms
Known Hazards The root contains 8-methoxypsoralen, this stimulates the production of pigmentation in skin exposed to ultra-violet light, but it can cause side-effects. Use with caution[160]. Skin contact with the sap is said to cause photo-sensitivity and/or dermatitis in some people[218].
Habitats Waste places in Britain[17].
Range C. Europe to W. Asia and N. Africa. A casual in Britain[17].
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary       
Bloom Color: White. Main Bloom Time: Early summer, Late summer, Mid summer. Form: Irregular or sprawling, Upright or erect.

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of flower
Ammi majus is a ANNUAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 0.4 m (1ft 4in) at a medium rate. It is in flower from Jun to October, and the seeds ripen from Jul to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.


USDA hardiness zone : Coming soon


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Ammi majus Bishop


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ammi_majus_Sturm8.jpg
Ammi majus Bishop
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ammi_majus_002.JPG
   
Habitats       
 Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts:
Edible Uses: Condiment.

Seed - used as a condiment[177, 183].
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



The seed is contraceptive, diuretic and tonic[238]. An infusion is used to calm the digestive system, whilst it is also used in the treatment of asthma and angina[254]. A decoction of the ground-up seed, eaten after intercourse, appears able to prevent implantation of the fertilized ovum in the uterus[238]. This decoction is also used as a gargle in the treatment of toothache[238]. The seed contains furanocoumarins (including bergapten), which stimulate pigment production in skin that is exposed to bright sunlight[238, 254]. The plant is widely cultivated in India for these furanocoumarins which are used in the treatment of vitiligo (piebald skin) and psoriasis[238, 254].
Other Uses
Weather protection.

The root is chewed to give protection from strong sunlight. It contains 8-methoxypsoralen which stimulates production of pigment in skin exposed to U.V. light. Caution is advised, however, since it can cause side-effects[160]. Other reports suggest that it is the seeds that are used[238, 254].
Cultivation details                                         
Landscape Uses:Border, Massing, Specimen. Prefers a well-drained soil in a sunny position[238], succeeding in ordinary garden soil. This species is often cultivated for its attractive flowering stems which are often sold in markets[238]. It is cultivated in India as a medicinal herb[238]. Special Features: Attractive foliage, Not North American native, Suitable for cut flowers.
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - sow spring or autumn in situ[238].
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
L.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
17
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[160]Natural Food Institute, Wonder Crops. 1987.
Fascinating reading, this is an annual publication. Some reports do seem somewhat exaggerated though.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[183]Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants.
Excellent. Contains a very wide range of conventional and unconventional food plants (including tropical) and where they can be obtained (mainly N. American nurseries but also research institutes and a lot of other nurseries from around the world.
[238]Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses.
A very well presented and informative book on herbs from around the globe. Plenty in it for both the casual reader and the serious student. Just one main quibble is the silly way of having two separate entries for each plant.
[254]Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants
An excellent guide to over 500 of the more well known medicinal herbs from around the world.

Readers comment                                         
 
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