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Ambrosia artemesiifolia - L.
                 
Common Name Roman Wormwood, Bitterweed, Blackweed, Carrot Weed, Hay Fever Weed, Stickeweed, Tassel Weed, Wild Ta
Family Asteraceae or Compositae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards The pollen of this plant is a major cause of hayfever in N. America[207, 222]. Ingesting or touching the plant can cause allergic reactions in some people[222].
Habitats Waste places in Western N. America[60]. Found in dry soils, it can become a pernicious weed in cultivated soils[235].
Range N. America - British Columbia to Nova Scotia and Florida. Locally established casual in Britain[17].
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential Yes
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary
Bloom Color: Green. Main Bloom Time: Early fall, Late summer, Mid summer, Mid fall. Form: Upright or erect. Other Names : Annual Ragweed, Bitterweed, Blackweed, Carrot Weed, Hay Fever Weed, Roman Wormwood, Stammerwort, Stickweed, Tassel Weed, Wild Tansy, and American Wormwood.

Ambrosia artemesiifolia Roman Wormwood, Bitterweed, Blackweed, Carrot Weed, Hay Fever Weed, Stickeweed, Tassel Weed, Wild Ta


http://www.hear.org/starr/
Ambrosia artemesiifolia Roman Wormwood, Bitterweed, Blackweed, Carrot Weed, Hay Fever Weed, Stickeweed, Tassel Weed, Wild Ta
http://www.hear.org/starr/
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of flower
Ambrosia artemesiifolia is a ANNUAL growing to 0.9 m (3ft) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 4. It is in flower from Aug to October. The flowers are monoecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant) and are pollinated by Wind.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms
A. elatior.

Habitats
Woodland Garden Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Oil.
Edible Uses: Oil.

An oil is obtained from the seed. It has been suggested for edible purposes because it contains little linolenic acid[61, 183]. The seed contains up to 19% oil[61], it has slightly better drying properties than soya bean oil[183].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antidote;  Astringent;  Disinfectant;  Emetic;  Febrifuge;  Women's complaints.

The leaves are very astringent, emetic and febrifuge[222, 257]. They are applied externally to insect bites, rheumatic joints and various skin complaints, internally they are used as a tea in the treatment of fevers, pneumonia, nausea, intestinal cramps, diarrhoea and mucous discharges[222, 257]. Juice from the wilted leaves is disinfectant and is applied to infected toes[257]. A tea made from the roots is used in the treatment of menstrual disorders and stroke[222]. The pollen is harvested commercially and manufactured into pharmaceutical preparations for the treatment of allergies to the plant[222].
Other Uses
Disinfectant;  Oil.

There is some indication it has been used as a disinfectant and Oil.
Cultivation details
We have very little information on this species but suggest growing it in a sunny position in a well-drained soil. It has been suggested for commercial cultivation[61]. Some plants produce mainly sterile heads[60]. The pollen from the flowers of this species is an important cause of hay-fever in N. America[17]. Special Features:North American native, Invasive, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.
Propagation
Seed - we have no details for this species but suggest sowing the seed in situ in April.

Books by Plants For A Future

Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

It is listed as a noxious weed in Illinois (common ragweed) and Oregon (ragweed)as a "B" designated weed. Ragweed is a very competitive weed and can produce yield losses in soybeans as high as 30%. Control with night tillage reduces emergence by around 45%. Small grains in rotation will also suppress common ragweed if they are overseeded with clover. Otherwise, the ragweed will grow and mature and produce seed in the small grain stubble.
Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status : This taxon has not yet been assessed.
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Ambrosia trifidaGiant Ragweed, Great ragweed, Texan great ragweed, Bitterweed, Bloodweed, Buffalo Weed, Horse Cane13
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Expert comment
 
Author
L.
Botanical References
60235
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
David Beaulieu Sat Sep 30 2006
Also known as "common ragweed," Ambrosia artemesiifolia blooms at the same time as goldenrod, in late summer-early fall. Being by far the more conspicuous of the two, goldenrod has become the scapegoat for hay fever. But common ragweed is the true culprit.

Common Ragweed and Hay Fever Introduction to Ambrosia artemesiifolia, including pictures.

Elizabeth H.
iank Mon Oct 13 2008
"Decomposing Ragweed poisons the soil, stunting the growth of newly germinated Ragweed seeds, as well as those of other plants. Ragweed seeds are heavily fed upon by birds, especially sparrows." -Eastern Forests. A Field guide to birds, mammals, trees, flowers and more.
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Subject : Ambrosia artemesiifolia  

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