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Acer platanoides - L.                
                 
Common Name Norway Maple, Harlequin Maple
Family Aceraceae
Synonyms
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Grows on all but very poor soils in Britain[17].
Range Europe, from Scandanavia to the Urals and the Mediterranean, east to W.Asia. Naturalized in Britain.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary       
Bloom Color: Green. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring.Form: Rounded, Spreading or horizontal, Upright or erect.

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of lolypop
Acer platanoides is a deciduous Tree growing to 21 m (69ft) by 15 m (49ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 3. It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are monoecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant) and are pollinated by Bees.

USDA hardiness zone : 3-7


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

Acer platanoides Norway Maple,  Harlequin Maple


(c) ken Fern, Plants For A Future 2010
Acer platanoides Norway Maple,  Harlequin Maple
   
Habitats       
Woodland Garden Canopy;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts: Sap.
Edible Uses: Sweetener.

The sap contains a certain amount of sugar and can either be used as a drink, or can be concentrated into a syrup by boiling off the water[4, 105, 177]. The syrup is used as a sweetener on many foods. The concentration of sugar is considerably lower than in the sugar maples (A. saccharum)[2]. The tree trunk is tapped in the early spring, the sap flowing better on warm sunny days following a frost. The best sap production comes from cold-winter areas with continental climates.
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known
Other Uses
Dye;  Preservative;  Shelterbelt;  Wood.

The leaves are packed around apples, rootcrops etc to help preserve them[18, 20]. The trees are fairly wind tolerant and are often used in to give protection from the wind in mixed shelterbelts[200]. They are fast-growing and rapidly produce a screen[200]. A rose coloured dye is obtained from the bark[57]. Wood - hard, heavy, fine grained. Used for small domestic items[4, 13, 46, 61].
Cultivation details                                         
Landscape Uses:Firewood, Aggressive surface roots possible, Pollard, Screen. Of easy cultivation, it prefers a good moist well-drained soil but thrives in any soil[11, 17]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a sunny position but tolerates some shade[11, 200]. One report says that plants tolerate chalky soils[200], but another says that plants can develop chlorosis as a result of iron deficiency when they are grown in alkaline soils. Trees are very tolerant of atmospheric pollution[226]. The Norway maple is a quick-growing tree that has been widely planted in Britain and is more or less naturalized. There are many named forms that have been selected for their ornamental value[11]. Norway maple is a bad companion plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants[18, 20]. The leaves are seldom eaten or defaced by insects because the tree contains a sharp milky juice that they dislike[4]. Trees take 30 years to produce seed[98]. Special Features: Not North American native, Invasive, Naturalizing, Attractive flowers or blooms.
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame, it usually germinates in the following spring. Pre-soak stored seed for 24 hours and then stratify for 2 - 4 months at 1 - 8°c. It can be slow to germinate. The seed can be harvested 'green' (when it has fully developed but before it has dried and produced any germination inhibitors) and sown immediately. It should germinate in late winter. If the seed is harvested too soon it will produce very weak plants or no plants at all[80, 113]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on until they are 20cm or more tall before planting them out in their permanent positions. Layering, which takes about 12 months, is successful with most species in this genus. Cuttings of young shoots in June or July. The cuttings should have 2 - 3 pairs of leaves, plus one pair of buds at the base. Remove a very thin slice of bark at the base of the cutting, rooting is improved if a rooting hormone is used. The rooted cuttings must show new growth during the summer before being potted up otherwise they are unlikely to survive the winter. Cultivars can be budded onto rootstocks of the species. Any grafting is best carried out in September rather than February.
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
L.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
11200
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

[2]Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World.
Lots of entries, quite a lot of information in most entries and references.
[4]Grieve. A Modern Herbal.
Not so modern (1930's?) but lots of information, mainly temperate plants.
[11]Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement.
A classic with a wealth of information on the plants, but poor on pictures.
[13]Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants.
Very interesting reading, giving some details of plant uses and quite a lot of folk-lore.
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[18]Philbrick H. and Gregg R. B. Companion Plants.
Details of beneficial and antagonistic relationships between neighbouring plants.
[20]Riotte. L. Companion Planting for Successful Gardening.
Fairly good.
[46]Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants.
An excellent and very comprehensive guide but it only gives very short descriptions of the uses without any details of how to utilize the plants. Not for the casual reader.
[57]Schery. R. W. Plants for Man.
Fairly readable but not very comprehensive. Deals with plants from around the world.
[61]Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man.
Forget the sexist title, this is one of the best books on the subject. Lists a very extensive range of useful plants from around the world with very brief details of the uses. Not for the casual reader.
[80]McMillan-Browse. P. Hardy Woody Plants from Seed.
Does not deal with many species but it is very comprehensive on those that it does cover. Not for casual reading.
[98]Gordon. A. G. and Rowe. D. C. f. Seed Manual for Ornamental Trees and Shrubs.
Very comprehensive guide to growing trees and shrubs from seed. Not for the casual reader.
[105]Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World.
The most comprehensive guide to edible plants I've come across. Only the briefest entry for each species, though, and some of the entries are more than a little dubious. Not for the casual reader.
[113]Dirr. M. A. and Heuser. M. W. The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation.
A very detailed book on propagating trees. Not for the casual reader.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[200]Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
[226]Lauriault. J. Identification Guide to the Trees of Canada
Very good on identification for non-experts, the book also has a lot of information on plant uses.

Readers comment                                         
 
Elizabeth H.
Mon Nov 19 01:43:13 2001
You should add the reproductive cycle on here.
Elizabeth H.
Wed Feb 19 16:59:22 2003
The very dense canopy inhibits the growth of any plant other than its own seedlings.
Elizabeth H.
Mon Aug 30 23:11:19 2004
Acer platanoides is an invasive species in North America and can be detrimental to the native community.
Elizabeth H.
Zepigi Pessina Marinella Sun Oct 29 2006

Il Forum dei Funghi e Fiori in Italia - Micologia e Botanica scheda

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Subject : Acer platanoides  
             

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