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Acacia melanoxylon - R.Br.
                 
Common Name Blackwood, Australia Acacia, Black Acacia, Blackwood Acacia
Family Fabaceae or Leguminosae
USDA hardiness 9-11
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Wet forests on good soils up to the montane zone[152, 154]. Usually an under-storey tree in Eucalyptus forests[167].
Range Australia - New South Wales, Tasmania, Victoria. Locally naturalized in S.W. Europe[50].
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential Yes
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Frost Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Full sun

Summary
Bloom Color: Brown, Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Form: Spreading or horizontal, Upright or erect.

Acacia melanoxylon Blackwood, Australia Acacia, Black Acacia, Blackwood Acacia


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Ixitixel
Acacia melanoxylon Blackwood, Australia Acacia, Black Acacia, Blackwood Acacia
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of cone
Acacia melanoxylon is an evergreen Tree growing to 30 m (98ft 5in) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower in April. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)It can fix Nitrogen.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Synonyms

Habitats
Woodland Garden Secondary; Sunny Edge; South Wall. By. West Wall. By.
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Flowers.
Edible Uses:

Flowers - cooked[144]. Rich in pollen, they are often used in fritters. The flowers have a penetrating scent[245].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antirheumatic.

Antirheumatic[152].
Other Uses
Dye;  Soil stabilization;  Tannin;  Wood.

A yellow dye is obtained from the flowers[168]. A green dye is obtained from the seed pods[168]. The extensive root system of this plant helps to prevent soil erosion[200]. The bark is rich in tannin[152]. Wood - hard, dark, close grained, high quality, takes a high polish. Used for furniture, fittings etc[1, 4, 11, 154, 156, 167].
Cultivation details
Landscape Uses:Pest tolerant, Specimen, Street tree. Prefers a sandy loam and a very sunny position[1]. Prefers a deep moist soil[167]. Succeeds in a hot dry position[166]. Succeeds in any good garden soil that is not excessively limey[11]. Most members of this genus become chlorotic on limey soils[200]. This is one of the hardier members of the genus, tolerating temperatures down to about -10°c[260]. It succeeds outdoors in Britain from Dorset westwards, also in south-western Scotland and in Ireland[1, 11]. However, even in the mildest areas of the country it is liable to be cut back to the ground in excessively cold winters though it can resprout from the base[11]. It is planted for timber in south-west Europe[50]. This species produces both phyllodes (basically a flattened stem that looks and acts like a leaf) and true leaves[1, 166]. The roots are very vigorous and extensive - they often produce suckers[260] and can damage the foundations of buildings[200]. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200]. Special Features:Attracts birds, Not North American native, Attractive flowers or blooms.
Propagation
Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a sunny position in a warm greenhouse[1]. Stored seed should be scarified, pre-soaked for 12 hours in warm water and then sown in a warm greenhouse in March. The seed germinates in 3 - 4 weeks at 25°c[133]. As soon as the seedlings are large enough to handle, prick them out into individual pots and grow them on in a sunny position in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts, and consider giving them some protection from the cold for their first winter outdoors. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in individual pots in a frame[78]. Overwinter in a greenhouse for the first winter and plant out in their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Fair percentage[78].
Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

This plant can be weedy or invasive in Hawaii.[1c]
Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status : This taxon has not yet been assessed.
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Acacia aneuraMulga Acacia30
Acacia auriculiformisEar-Pod Wattle, Black Acacia, Earleaf, Black wattle10
Acacia concinnaShikakai, Soap-Pod21
Acacia coriaceaWiry Wattle, Acacia, Leather Leaf30
Acacia cultriformisKnife-Leaf Wattle, Knife acacia20
Acacia dealbataMimosa, Silver wattle20
Acacia decurrensGreen Wattle21
Acacia farnesianaSweet Acacia, Perfume Acacia, Huisache22
Acacia longifoliaSydney Golden Wattle, Acacia30
Acacia mearnsiiBlack Wattle, Late black wattle13
Acacia mucronataNarrow-Leaf Wattle20
Acacia paradoxaKangaroo Thorn, Paradox acacia10
Acacia podalyriifoliaQueensland Silver Wattle, Pearl wattle10
Acacia pycnanthaGolden Wattle20
Acacia retinodesSwamp Wattle, Water wattle20
Acacia salignaBlue-Leaved Wattle, Orange wattle10
Acacia sophoraeCoastal Wattle, Acacia20
Acacia verticillataPrickly Moses10
Arracacia xanthorrhizaArracacha40
Robinia pseudoacaciaBlack Locust, Yellow Locust32
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Expert comment
 
Author
R.Br.
Botanical References
11154200
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
mr & mrs burns Thu Nov 17 2005
hello. my partner and i are doing an assignment on blackwood/ acacia. this has been helpful.
Elizabeth H.
pat Mon Oct 13 2008
ive heard it can be used as an analgaesic, which part of the plant is used for this? How is it prepared? any information would be very helpful and i understand that you cannot be held responsible for any adverse affects of using the plant
Elizabeth H.
David Nicholls Tue Oct 14 2008
Ref 152 states that the Australian Aborigines treated Rheumatic joints with a heated infusion of roasted bark. It seems conceivable they were treating the pain rather than eliminating the rheumatism itself. The same reference only mentions tannins as chemical constituents of the bark.
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Subject : Acacia melanoxylon  

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