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Phyllostachys nigra punctata - (Bean.)Makino.

Common Name Kurodake
Family Poaceae or Gramineae
USDA hardiness 6-9
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Fertile and moist places, also by streams[147].
Range E. Asia - E. and C. China.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade
Phyllostachys nigra punctata Kurodake


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Phyllostachys nigra punctata Kurodake
www.flickr.com/photos/weretable

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Phyllostachys nigra punctata is an evergreen Bamboo growing to 6 m (19ft 8in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 7. It is in leaf 12-Jan. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Stem.
Edible Uses:

Young shoots - cooked. Somewhat acrid, they are prepared for eating by boiling in one change of water, the water being changed after 8 - 10 minutes. A distinctive taste and aroma. The shoots are harvested in the spring when they are about 8cm above the ground, cutting them about 5cm below soil level.

Medicinal Uses



Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antiemetic;  Depurative;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  Febrifuge;  Sedative.

The leaves are antipyretic and diuretic[218]. They are used internally in the treatment of fevers (especially infantile convulsions), vomiting and nosebleeds[238]. The leave are harvested during the growing season and dried for later use[238]. The juice of the stems is antipyretic, antitussive, expectorant and sedative[147, 176, 218]. It is taken internally in the treatment of lung infections with cough and phlegm[238]. The sap is pressed from young stems in the summer and then dried for later use[238]. The epidermis of the stem bark is antiemetic and sedative[147, 176, 218]. It is used internally in the treatment of vomiting, nosebleeds, coughs etc[238]. The epidermis is collected from young stems in the summer and is dried for later use[238]. The root is astringent, antipyretic, depurative, diuretic and styptic[147, 176, 218]. It has been used in the treatment of rabies[147, 238]. A decoction is also used in the treatment of high fevers and nocturnal fretfulness in infants[147]. The roots are harvested in the winter and dried for later use[238].

Other Uses

Basketry;  Plant support.

The canes make good plant supports. The rhizome is used in making umbrella handles, wickerwork, canes etc.

Cultivation details

Requires a rich damp soil in a sheltered position[200] and plenty of moisture in the growing season[1]. A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to at least -7°c, but it dislikes prolonged exposure to hard frosts[200]. A very ornamental plant[1], this form of P. nigra is often grown for food and ornament. This species is notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. Plants only flower at intervals of many years. When they do come into flower most of the plants energies are directed into producing seed and consequently the plant is severely weakened. They sometimes die after flowering, but if left alone they will usually recover though they will look very poorly for a few years. If fed with artificial NPK fertilizers at this time the plants are more likely to die[122]. This is a good companion species to grow in a woodland because the plants are shallow rooted and do not compete with deep rooted trees[195]. The plant has a running rootstock, though not aggressively so in the cooler climate of Britain[200]. and it produces new shoots from May[25]. Dead stems can be removed at any time of the year[238]. It is also possible to thin the clumps in spring, leaving only the strongest stems and thus creating an open grove-like effect[238]. Cultivated for its edible young shoots in China[61]. This species has been widely planted for ornament in the Mediterranean and is becoming established[50].

Propagation

Seed - surface sow as soon as it is ripe in a greenhouse at about 20°c. Do not allow the compost to dry out. Germination usually takes place fairly quickly so long as the seed is of good quality, though it can take 3 - 6 months. Grow on in a lightly shaded place in the greenhouse until large enough to plant out. Seed is rarely available. Division in spring as new growth commences. Divisions from the open ground do not transplant well, so will need careful treatment and nurturing under cover in pots until at least late spring[238]. Division is best carried out in wet weather and small divisions will establish better than large clumps[238]. Another report says that you can take large divisions from established clumps and transfer them straight to their permanent positions, misting or drenching them frequently until they are established[200]. Basal cane cuttings in spring.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Phyllostachys angustaStone Bamboo30
Phyllostachys arcanaHalf-Black Bamboo30
Phyllostachys aureaGolden Bamboo, Fishpole Bamboo50
Phyllostachys aureosulcataYellow-Groove Bamboo40
Phyllostachys bambusoidesMadake, Japanese timber bamboo41
Phyllostachys bissetii 00
Phyllostachys dulcisSweetshoot Bamboo40
Phyllostachys edulisMoso-Chiku, Tortoise shell bamboo41
Phyllostachys flexuosaZig-Zag Bamboo, Drooping timber bamboo30
Phyllostachys glauca 30
Phyllostachys iridescens 30
Phyllostachys makinoiKei-Chiku, Makino bamboo30
Phyllostachys meyeriMeyer Bamboo00
Phyllostachys nidulariaBig-Node Bamboo, Broom bamboo50
Phyllostachys nigraBlack Bamboo, Kuro-Chiku43
Phyllostachys nigra henonisHa-Chiku43
Phyllostachys nuda 40
Phyllostachys parvifolia 30
Phyllostachys praecox 30
Phyllostachys propinqua 30
Phyllostachys purpurata 30
Phyllostachys rubromarginataRreddish bamboo30
Phyllostachys sulphureaOugon-Kouchiku, Sulphur bamboo00
Phyllostachys sulphurea viridisKou-Chiku40
Phyllostachys viridiglaucescensGreenwax golden bamboo40
Phyllostachys vivaxGiant Timber Bamboo, Running giant bamboo30

 

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Expert comment

Author

(Bean.)Makino.

Botanical References

11200

Links / References

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Readers comment

Dave   Fri Jun 10 04:15:13 2005

In temperate zones, this bamboo is reputed to grow to 18m, with a 5 inch culm diameter, a much larger species than is indicated in your description. It should be considered a timber bamboo; it is moderately more shade tolerant than other phyllostachys, but still requires adequate sunlight to grow to it's full size.

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Subject : Phyllostachys nigra punctata  
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