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Cleome gynandra - L.

Common Name African Spider Flower, Spiderwisp
Family Capparidaceae
USDA hardiness 8-12
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Open areas and uncultivated land to an elevation of 300 metres in Nepal[272].
Range Tropical and Sub-Tropical zones.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential Yes
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Half Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Full sun
Cleome gynandra African Spider Flower, Spiderwisp


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cleome_gynandra_Blanco1.233-cropped.jpg
Cleome gynandra African Spider Flower, Spiderwisp
http://www.hear.org/starr/

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Cleome gynandra is a ANNUAL growing to 1.3 m (4ft 3in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 9 and is frost tender. It is in leaf 10-May It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Synonyms

Gynandropsis gynandra. (L.)Briq. G. pentaphylla. DC.

Habitats

 Cultivated Beds;

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal Uses



Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Anthelmintic;  Febrifuge;  Rubefacient;  Stings.

A decoction of the root is used to treat fevers[243, 272]. The juice of the root is used to relieve scorpion stings[272]. The leaves, applied as a poultice, are used as a vesicant and rubefacient in the treatment of rheumatism[243, 272]. The juice of the leaves is a remedy for pain in the ear[243]. The seeds are anthelmintic and rubefacient[243, 272]. The whole plant is used in the treatment of scorpion stings and snake bites[243].

Other Uses

None known

Cultivation details

Prefers a light fertile soil in a warm dry sunny position with plenty of room to spread[1, 200]. A frost tender plant, it can be grown as a summer annual in Britain[200].

Propagation

Seed - surface sow or only lightly cover the seed in spring in a greenhouse[164]. The seed usually germinates in 5 - 14 days at 25°c[164]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in late spring. Day time temperatures below 20°c depress germination but a night time fall to 20° is necessary[164].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Shona cabbage, African cabbage, spiderwisp, cat's whiskers,chinsaga, stinkweed. Adikyakharan, African spider-flower, Akeyo, Akiya, Alot dek, Amazonde, Ansarisha, Apoy-apoyan, Arkapushpika, Bagra, Balaya, Bangara, Bastard-mustard, Bhubhuwan, Chamani, Churota, Ejjobyo, Ekaboi, Ekeyo, Ekiau, Enceng-enceng, Eshoje, Eyobyo, Gandhuli, Gasaya, Ghandhatu, Hulul, Isaga, Jirri, Kadughoo, Kanphodi, Karavela, Kathal, Kattkadugu, Ketota, Knasi, Kornia, Langsana, Lerotho, Lubanga, Lude, Luni, Mamang, Manabo, Mangmang trang, Marang charmani, Mgagani, Mgange, Momienh, Motitlavan, Mutaka, Narum byale soppu, Neivaylla, Nsila, Nyevhe, Nyovhi, Pak-sian, Paksienedit, Pandharitilavan, Parhar, Phak sian, Rothwe, Rudhe, Runi, Sada hurhuria, Satitalvani, Seta kata arak, Sienz, Sishungwa, Shungwa, Spiderwisp, Suntha, Surjavarta, Taivela, Taiwela, Tegeri, Thaivalaikeerai, Tim-Légué, Tsuna, Ulube, Ulude, Umzonde, Vainta, Valay keeray, Vaminta, Velai, Velakura.

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Afghanistan, Africa, Angola, Argentina, Asia, Australia, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Britain, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central Africa, Central African Republic, CAR, Central America, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Dominican Republic, East Africa, East Timor, Egypt, Equatorial-Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Europe, Fiji, France, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guiana, Guinea, Guianas, Guinée, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indochina, Indonesia, Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Laos, Lesser Antilles, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, North Africa, North America, Oman, Pacific, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, PNG, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Reunion, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, SE Asia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Southern Africa, South America, South Sudan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam, Virgin Islands, West Africa, West Indies, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Cleome gynandra is considered an invasive weed in many places in the U.S. and in the Pacific.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status : This taxon has not yet been assessed.

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Cleome luteaYellow Spiderflower, Jones spiderflower21
Cleome monophylla 21
Cleome ornithopodioidesBird spiderflower10
Cleome serrulataRocky Mountain Beeplant31
Cleome viscosaTickweed, Asian spiderflower22

 

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Expert comment

Author

L.

Botanical References

200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Flora Sicolani Todlana   Sat May 15 14:10:56 2004

Cleome gynandra is an adible plant found in Zimbabwe mostly, during rain season. This wild plant is eaten fresh as relish and may be cooked and dried for cunsumption during dry seasons. It is called "ULUDE" in Zulu or Ndebele. It tastes very bitter originally, but boiling it with vegetable oil, tomatoes and a pinch of salt makes is a good relish. Author's name: Flo Todlana. [email protected]

F Lakor   Sun Mar 12 2006

Flora Sicolani Todlana-Lakor Cleome gynandra is an adible plant found in Zimbabwe mostly, during rain season. This wild plant is eaten fresh as relish and may be cooked and dried for consumption during dry seasons. It is called "ULUDE" in Zulu or Ndebele. It tastes very bitter (highly alkaloidal) originally, but cooking/boiling it with vegetable oil, tomatoes/onions and a pinch of salt makes is a good relish. Author's name: F Todlana-Lakor.

   Thu Mar 27 2008

Cleome gynandra is a well known and used edibla plant for the majority people in namivbia, the Wambo, living in their reagon in the NOth called Owambo. It is called in their languga eOshiwambo "Ombidi" and prepared like spinach. In English the Wambo call the plant "wild spinach".

   Thu Mar 27 2008

Cleome gynandra is a well known and edible plant for the majority people in Namibia, the Wambo, living in their reagon in the North of Namibia called Owambo. It is called in their language Oshiwambo "Ombidi" and prepared like spinach. In English the Wambo call the plant "wild spinach".

Loma Fefe Sigogo   Wed May 21 2008

Flora Sicolani Todlana-Lakor Cleome gynandra is an adible plant found in Zimbabwe mostly, during rain season. This wild plant is eaten fresh as relish and may be cooked and dried for consumption during dry seasons. It is called "ULUDE" in Zulu or Ndebele. It tastes very bitter (highly alkaloidal) originally, but cooking/boiling it with vegetable oil, tomatoes/onions and a pinch of salt makes it a good relish. Author's name: F Todlana

Melenia Khuzwayo   Tue Jul 22 2008

Ulude can not be classified for any medical reasons or use. Class = Food

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