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Celastrus orbiculatus - Thunb.

Common Name Oriental Bittersweet
Family Celastraceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Thickets on grassy slopes in lowland and mountains all over Japan[58]. Forest edges in China[147].
Range N.E. Asia - China, Japan, Korea.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential Yes
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full shade Semi-shade Full sun
Celastrus orbiculatus Oriental Bittersweet


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Celastrus orbiculatus Oriental Bittersweet
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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of climber
Celastrus orbiculatus is a deciduous Climber growing to 12 m (39ft) by 12 m (39ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 4. It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Nov to February. The species is dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required). and are pollinated by Bees. Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms

C. articulatus. Thunb.

Habitats

Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge; not Deep Shade; Hedge;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Leaves.
Edible Uses:

Young leaves - cooked[105, 177].

Medicinal Uses



Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antiphlogistic;  Antirheumatic;  Cancer;  Depurative;  Tonic.

The roots, stems and leaves are antiphlogistic, antirheumatic, depurative and tonic[147, 218]. A decoction of the roots and stems is used internally whilst the crushed fresh leaves are used for external applications[147]. The plant is used in the treatment of paralysis, numbness of the four extremities, headache, toothache, spontaneous abscess formation and snake bites[147]. Many plants in this genus contain compounds of interest for their antitumour activity[218].

Other Uses

Hedge;  Hedge.

Used as a hedge[58]. Ornamental.

Cultivation details

Prefers a deep loamy soil[1] but succeeds in most soils so long as they are not too shallow[202]. Succeeds in full or partial shade[188]. Plants flower more freely if their top-growth is in the sun[182]. Requires a humus-rich soil if it is to be at its best[219]. A very ornamental plant[1], it is hardy to about -25°c[200]. A rampant climber, it requires ample space and is best grown into an old tree[1, 200. It climbs by means of twining and also by the young stems having prickles[182]. Plants do not normally require pruning[219]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. Plants are usually dioecious, in which case male and female plants must be grown if seed is required, but hermaphrodite forms are in cultivation[11, 182, 200].

Propagation

Seed - gather when ripe, store in dry sand and sow February in a warm greenhouse[78]. Three months cold stratification leads to a higher germination rate[113]. Remove the flesh of the fruit since this inhibits germination[113]. Germination rates are usually good[78]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame[188]. Layering in August of the current seasons growth. Takes 12 months[78]. Root cuttings, 6mm thick 25mm long in December. Plant horizontally in pots in a frame[78].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Preferred Common Name: Asiatic bittersweet. Other English: Asian bittersweet; Chinese bittersweet; Japanese bittersweet; oriental bittersweet. Germany: Baumwürger, Rundblättriger. Japan: tsuru-ume-mo-doki. New Zealand: climbing spindleberry. USA: round-leaved bittersweet. Others: Baiwanye, Man she teng, Nobaktonggul.

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Asia: China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Taiwan, USA, Europe: Russia, UK, Oceania: Australia, New Zealand.

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Considered to be an invasive species in eastern North America. As a fast growing, twining vine, C. orbiculatus is a threat to other plants through constriction of the woody stems it climbs upon leading to slowed growth and eventually mechanical failure, over-topping and shading out plants beneath it, and outright competition for resources [1d].

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status : This taxon has not yet been assessed.

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Expert comment

Author

Thunb.

Botanical References

1158200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Valerie Wenham   Sun Jan 23 10:32:51 2005

How can I tell which seedling or plant is male or which female? I already have one plant which is non-productive, and want to supply a mate! Many thanks - Valerie

   Wed Jun 20 2007

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE FOR THE CELASTRUS ORBICULATUS TO FLOWER AND TO GERMINATE? THANK YOU.

   Dec 10 2010 12:00AM

Please note that this plant is highly invasive outside of its native range.

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Subject : Celastrus orbiculatus  
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