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Corymbia citriodora - (Hook.) K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson
                 
Common Name Lemon-Scented Gum, blue spotted gum, lemon eucalyptus, eucalyptus citriodora.
Family Myrtaceae
USDA hardiness 10-12
Known Hazards Citronellal, an essential oil found in most Eucalyptus species is reported to be mutagenic when used in isolation[ 269 ]. In large doses, oil of eucalyptus, like so many essential oils has caused fatalities from intestinal irritation[ 269 ]. Death is reported from ingestion of 4 - 24 ml of essential oils, but recoveries are also reported for the same amount[ 269 ]. Symptoms include gastroenteric burning and irritation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, oxygen deficiency, ,weakness, dizziness, stupor, difficult respiration, delirium, paralysis, convulsions, and death, usually due to respiratory failure[ 269 ].
Habitats Usually found in heavy soils[ 77 ], but also succeeding on deep sandy loams in coastal regions[ 153 ].
Range Australia - Queensland, New South Wales.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential Yes
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Tender Moist Soil Full sun

Summary
Lemon-scented gum or Corymbia citriodora is a medium to large evergreen tree with smooth powdery bark that is pale grey, cream or pink in colour. It is widely cultivated in Australia for its timber and essential oil and often grown as an ornamental tree. Its leaves are used as herbal remedy. It yields essential oil used against coughs and colds, sore throats, cuts, skin infections, blocked nasal passages, etc. However, it should not be consumed in high amount to avoid toxic effects on the body. Aside from the medicinal uses, the oil is also used in perfumery especially that this species has high citronella content. It is also used as an insect repellent. The tree sources an oleo-resin which contains tannins used in the treatment of diarrhoea, bladder inflammation, and cuts. The plant produces a sweet manna-like substance that is scraped off the leaves and eaten. The wood is hard and durable, and used in general and heavy constructions and for fuel. C. citriodora is endemic to temperate and tropical eastern Australia. Extensively planted as an ornamental tree in many regions of the world, and has been planted for commercial purposes in South America (mainly in Brazil), China, India, Sri Lanka, Central America, the West-Indies, and most countries in southern Africa. In South-East Asia it is mainly planted in Peninsular Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Also known as: Lemon-scented gum, citron-scent gum; Lemon gum tree. Spanish: eucalipto. French: Eucalyptus a odeur de citron. Australia: lemon-scented iron gum; spotted gum; spotted iron gum. Germany: Zitronen- Eukalyptus. Italy: Eucalipto a profumo di limone. Puerto Rico: eucalipto de lim?n; eucalipto de pantano; eucalipto oloroso.

Corymbia citriodora Lemon-Scented Gum, blue spotted gum, lemon eucalyptus, eucalyptus citriodora.


Tatiana Gerus flickr
Corymbia citriodora Lemon-Scented Gum, blue spotted gum, lemon eucalyptus, eucalyptus citriodora.
Tortie tude wikimedia.org
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of cone
Corymbia citriodora is an evergreen Tree growing to 45 m (147ft) by 30 m (98ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 10. and are pollinated by Bees.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Synonyms
Corymbia variegata (F.Muell.) K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. Eucalyptus macula

Habitats
Edible Uses
Produces a sweet manna-like substance that is scraped off the leaves and eaten[ 183 ]. Honey/honey flora plant. Spice and culinary herb.
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



Eucalyptus leaves are a traditional Aboriginal herbal remedy. The essential oil found in the leaves is a powerful antiseptic and is used all over the world for relieving coughs and colds, sore throats and other infections[ 254 ]. The essential oil is a common ingredient in many over-the-counter cold remedies[ 254 ]. An essential oil obtained from the leaves is antibacterial[ 152 ]. The essential oil obtained from various species of eucalyptus is a very powerful antiseptic, especially when it is old, because ozone is formed in it on exposure to air. It has a decided disinfectant action, destroying the lower forms of life[ 4 ]. The oil can be used externally, applied to cuts, skin infections etc, it can also be inhaled for treating blocked nasal passages, it can be gargled for sore throat and can also be taken internally for a wide range of complaints[ 4 ]. Some caution is advised, however, because like all essential oils, it can have a deleterious effect on the body in larger doses[ 4 ]. An oleo-resin is exuded from the tree[ 238 ]. It can also be obtained from the tree by making incisions in the trunk[ 4 , 152 ]. This resin contains tannin and is powerfully astringent, it is used internally in the treatment of diarrhoea and bladder inflammation[ 4 , 152 , 238 ], externally it is applied to cuts etc[ 4 , 152 ].
Other Uses
Fuels:Biofuels, Charcoal, Fuelwood. Environmental Uses: Ornamental, Amenity, Land reclamation, Revegetation, Shade and shelter, Windbreak. Other Uses: A lemon-scented essential oil is obtained from the leaves[ 4 , 46 , 77 , 269 ]. It is used, especially in perfumery but also medicinally[ 61 , 152 ]. The leaves yield between 0.5 to 2.0% essential oil[ 240 ]. This species is a very rich source of citronella, which is much used in the perfumery industry[ 4 , 156 ]. Some batches of the essential oil contain 98% citronella[ 4 ]. Glabrous leaves may contain oil with 65.5% citronellal, 12.2% citronella, and 3.6% isopulegol; hairy leaves contain more oil with 86.6- 90.1% citronellal, 4.6 - 6.0% citronella, and 0.7 - 0.8% isopulegol, 1-pinene, b-pinene, and isovaleric aldehyde are also recovered[ 269 ]. The leaves and the essential oil are used as an insect repellent[ 156 ]. The leaves are also an ingredient of potpourri[ 238 ]. The bark may contain up to 12% tannin[ 269 ]. The heartwood is pale grey-brown to dark brown; it is demarcated from the up to 60mm wide band of white or cream sapwood. The grain is straight or interlocked and occasionally wavy; the texture open and coarse. The wood is hard, strong and tough. It saws easily, planes well, but is rather difficult to nail and prone to checking and collapsing during drying. The timber is susceptible to marine borer and termite attack It is used for general and heavy construction such as frame and bridge construction, flooring, cladding, tool handles and case manufacturing[ 61 , 269 , 303 ]. The wood is used for fuel. The hard heavy wood (sp. grav. 0.75 - 1.1) burns steadily and makes a good charcoal with an ash content of 1 - 2%[ 269 ]. Environmental Ornamental, Amenity, Land reclamation, Revegetation, Shade and shelter, Windbreak.Environmental Ornamental, Amenity, Land reclamation, Revegetation, Shade and shelter, Windbreak.
Cultivation details
Succeeds in tropical and subtropical, arid to semiarid zones[ 269 ]. The plant is said to grow best where the annual rainfall, falling mostly in the summer, is 600 to 1,300mm, with a 5 - 7 month dry season[ 269 ]. Plants withstand high temperatures (29 - 35?c mean monthly maximum) and light frosts[ 269 ]. Prefers a sunny position in a moderately fertile well-drained moisture retentive circum-neutral soil[ 200 ]. Tolerates poor and dry soils, especially those low in mineral elements[ 200 ].Plants can be grown in infertile clays, laterites, poor and gravelly soils and podzols, preferably well drained[ 269 ]. Established plants are drought tolerant[ 200 ]. Does not succeed in frost hollows or in windy sites[ 107 ]. A very fast growing species[ 166 ]. Flowering usually starts within 2 years after planting and seeds are produced abundantly by 5 years of age[ 303 ]. When grown for fuel, yields of 10 - 21 cubic metres per hectare per year have been obtained[ 269 ]. Eucalyptus species have not adopted a deciduous habit and continue to grow until it is too cold for them to do so. This makes them more susceptible to damage from sudden cold snaps. If temperature fluctuations are more gradual, as in a woodland for example, the plants have the opportunity to stop growing and become dormant, thus making them more cold resistant. A deep mulch around the roots to prevent the soil from freezing also helps the trees to survive cold conditions[ 200 ]. The members of this genus are remarkably adaptable however, there can be a dramatic increase in the hardiness of subsequent generations from the seed of survivors growing in temperate zones[ 200 ]. Cultivated in warm temperate areas for its essential oil, it thrives in a Mediterranean climate[ 61 , 77 ]. Eucalyptus monocultures are an environmental disaster, they are voracious, allelopathic and encourage the worst possible attitudes to land use and conservation[ 200 ]. The trees cast a very light shade[ 77 ]. Flower buds are formed in the summer prior to flowering and seed capsules need at least a further year in which to ripen[ 11 ]. Plants are shallow-rooting and, especially in windy areas, should be planted out into their permanent positions when small to ensure that they do not suffer from wind-rock[ 245 ]. They strongly resent root disturbance and should be container grown before planting out into their permanent position[ 11 ]. The flowers are rich in nectar and are a good bee crop[ 200 ]. The leaves are strongly lemon-scented when crushed[ 303 ].
Propagation
Seed - surface sow in a seedtray in a sunny position and do not allow the compost to dry out[ 11 , 78 , 134 ]. Species that come from high altitudes appreciate 6 - 8 weeks cold stratification at 2?c[ 200 ]. Germination rates vary, but usually average 30 - 50%[ 303 ]. Rapid and complete germination is achieved under moist, warm conditions (25 - 30?c is optimal in the laboratory) in the presence of light[ 303 ]. The seeds of this species are relatively large for a eucalypt and can be sown directly without pre-treatment into containers filled with a sterilized freely draining mixture of loam and sand and covered with a light sprinkling of fine sand[ 303 ]. Pot up the seedlings into individual pots as soon as the second set of seed leaves has developed, if left longer than this they might not move well. Seedlings are planted out in the field when they reach a height of about 25 cm, 10 - 12 weeks after sowing. This should coincide with the onset of the rainy season in tropical countries[ 303 ]. The seed has a long viability[ 200 ].
Other Names
Lemon-scented gum or Corymbia citriodora. Also known as: Lemon-scented gum, citron-scent gum; Lemon gum tree. Spanish: eucalipto. French: Eucalyptus a odeur de citron. Australia: lemon-scented iron gum; spotted gum; spotted iron gum. Germany: Zitronen- Eukalyptus. Italy: Eucalipto a profumo di limone. Puerto Rico: eucalipto de lim—n; eucalipto de pantano; eucalipto oloroso.
Found In
C. citriodora is endemic to temperate and tropical eastern Australia. Extensively planted as an ornamental tree in many regions of the world, and has been planted for commercial purposes in South America (mainly in Brazil), China, India, Sri Lanka, Central America, the West-Indies, and most countries in southern Africa. In South-East Asia it is mainly planted in Peninsular Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Naturalized and invasive in disturbed areas and open forests. Once established, this species has the potential to out-compete native vegetation through the production of allelopathic substances which completely inhibit the germination, growth and establishment of native plants. C. corymbia may also reduce ground-water availability, modify soil nutrients and increase the risk of soil erosion. known to be invasive in Pakistan and Cuba.
Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status : This taxon has not yet been assessed
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Author
(Hook.) K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson
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For a list of references used on this page please go here
A special thanks to Ken Fern for some of the information used on this page.
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Subject : Corymbia citriodora  

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