homebanner homebanner homebanner homebanner homebanner homebanner
Chusquea culeou - E.Desv.
                 
Common Name Culeu
Family Poaceae or Gramineae
USDA hardiness 6-9
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Montane woodlands in the Andes[162].
Range S. America - Argentina, Chile.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade

Summary

Chusquea culeou Culeu


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Lin_linao
Chusquea culeou Culeu
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Lin_linao
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of flower
Chusquea culeou is an evergreen Bamboo growing to 5 m (16ft) by 2.5 m (8ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 7. It is in leaf 12-Jan. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Synonyms
C. andina. C. breviglumis.

Habitats
Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Stem.
Edible Uses:

Young shoots - cooked[25, 177].
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known
Other Uses
Musical;  Wood.

The canes are used in making musical instruments, plain furniture and fencing[139].
Cultivation details
Prefers a damp humus rich soil[200]. Prefers an open loam of reasonable quality, doing well on peat[11]. Likes plenty of moisture in the growing season[11]. Established plants are drought tolerant[25, 162, 195]. They require a position sheltered from cold north and east winds[11, 200]. A very hardy plant[25, 162], tolerating temperatures down to about -15°c[200]. Another report says that the plant is probably only hardy in the milder areas of the country[1]. It succeeds outdoors at Edinburgh Botanical Gardens[195] and is growing well at Kew[K]. This species is found further south in the world than any other species of bamboo, it grows in Chile as far south as latitude 47°south[195]. The rootstock is caespitose, new shoots are produced from late April and can grow 15cm overnight[25]. Plants take 2 - 3 years to settle down after being moved but are then quite fast growing[162]. Another report says that they are slow growing[188]. This species is notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. Plants flower and produce seed annually in the wild without dying as a result of the flowering[162]. Plants of the cultivar 'Tenuis' have been observed to be flowering in 1994, this is the first record of this species flowering in the northern hemisphere[214].
Propagation
Seed - surface sow as soon as it is ripe in a greenhouse at about 20°c. Do not allow the compost to dry out. Germination usually takes place fairly quickly so long as the seed is of good quality, though it can take 3 - 6 months. Grow on in a lightly shaded place in the greenhouse until large enough to plant out. Seed is rarely available. Division in spring as new growth commences. Very difficult[200]. Take divisions with at least four canes in the clump, trying to cause as little root disturbance to the main plant as possible. Grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse in pots of a high fertility sandy medium. Mist the foliage regularly until plants are established. Plant them out into their permanent positions when a good root system has developed, which can take a year or more[200]. Basal cane cuttings.
Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
Related Plants
Plant Suppliers: Click here for a List

      You can download this page as a PDF

Due to a fault in the PDF printer we are trying a few different options. Please try the one below

 

Print Friendly and PDF
Expert comment
 
Author
E.Desv.
Botanical References
11200
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
Tom Bennett Fri Oct 29 22:13:19 1999
For several years I grew Chusquea culeou in my garden in the north-east of England. It was originally given to me by the late John Treasure, of Tenbury Wells who got it from Christopher Lloyd, the noted plantsman and author of E. Sussex.

It thrived in a windy and somewhat miserable position, on medium soil, overlying heavy clay (though never waterlogged) and reached a height of 2.5m with a clump circumference of, I suppose, 4m. From an original one cane in 1989, there were 20-25 by 1997.

It never gave me any cause for concern and I propagated several plants for friends who admired it. I found that always at the base of the clump were some very small and wispy canes (with the diameter of straw). If one carefully scraped the soil away from around these, attached roots could be seen. If these canes and roots were detached from the clump in early May with a razor blade and potted-up, a plant good enough to plant out by the following late summer could be had.

I'd always understood that C. culeou didn't set seed in the UK, or if it did it wasn't viable - and this brings me on to the main point of this e-mail.

In 1998, my plant set masses of seed. On the offchance I gathered some last August and sowed it straight away. Within a fortnight it had germinated and was coming up like mustard and cress. I now have 50 plants, pricked-out and potted-up in 3.5" pots, mostly at the 5-6 cane stage. I did lose some but seeing as I moved to S.E England late last year, and I wasn't as careful of them as I should have been, they've come through very well.

Your entry on the net suggests C. culeou is tricky; my experience is that it is robust. It isn't difficult to propogate by division and my seedlings belie all I had previously read. Is my experience a fluke? I can't tell you whether or not the original plant has survived its seeding as, sadly, it was just too big to bring with me. When i last saw it last Xmas, it had enough green amongst the brown leaves to suggest it was probably going to pull through.

- Tom Bennett Stondon Massey, Essex.

QR Code

What's this?

This is a QR code (short for Quick Response) which gives fast-track access to our website pages. QR Codes are barcodes that can be read by mobile phone (smartphone) cameras. This QR Code is unique to this page. All plant pages have their own unique code. For more information about QR Codes click here.

1. Copy and print the QR code to a plant label, poster, book, website, magazines, newspaper etc and even t-shirts.
2. Smartphone users scan the QR Code which automatically takes them to the webpage the QR Code came from.
3. Smartphone users quickly have information on a plant directly for the pfaf.org website on their phone.
Add a comment/link

If you have important information about this plant that may help other users please add a comment or link below. Only comments or links that are felt to be directly relevant to a plant will be included. If you think a comment/link or information contained on this page is inaccurate or misleading we would welcome your feedback at admin@pfaf.org. If you have questions about a plant please use the Forum on this website as we do not have the resources to answer questions ourselves.

* Please note: the comments by website users are not necessarily those held by PFAF and may give misleading or inaccurate information.

To leave a comment please Register or login here All comments need to be approved so will not appear immediately.

Subject : Chusquea culeou  

Plant Uses

Edible Uses
Medicinal Uses
Other Plant uses
Woodland Gardening
Why Perennial Plants?
Top Edible Plants
Top Medicinal Plants
Garden Design
Habitats
Translations

Twiter      Facebook

Content

Content Help
Bookshop
Support Us
Blog
Links
Old Database Search
Suppliers
Contact
About Us
News
Sign In

PFAF Newsletter

Stay informed about PFAFs progress,
challenges and hopes by signing up for
our free email ePost. You will receive
a range of benefits including:
* Important announcements and news
* Exclusive content not on the website
* Updates on new information &
functionality of the website & database

We will not sell or share your email address.
You can unsubscribe at anytime.