homebanner homebanner homebanner homebanner homebanner homebanner
Ceanothus impressus - Trel.
                 
Common Name Santa Barbara Ceanothus
Family Rhamnaceae
USDA hardiness 7-9
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Grows in chapparal plant communities from sea level to elevations of 200 metres[276].
Range South-western N. America - coastal California.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary
Bloom Color: Blue, Lavender. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Form: Oval, Rounded.

Ceanothus impressus Santa Barbara Ceanothus


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Stan_Shebs
Ceanothus impressus Santa Barbara Ceanothus
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Stan_Shebs
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of shrub
Ceanothus impressus is an evergreen Shrub growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 1.5 m (5ft) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 7. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)It can fix Nitrogen.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Synonyms
C. dentatus impressus. (Trel.)Trel.
Habitats
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses
None known
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known
Other Uses
Dye;  Soap.

A green dye is obtained from the flowers[168]. All parts of the plant are rich in saponins - when crushed and mixed with water they produce a good lather which is an effective and gentle soap[168, 169]. This soap is very good at removing dirt, though it does not remove oils very well. This means that when used on the skin it will not remove the natural body oils, but nor will it remove engine oil etc[K] The flowers are a very good source, when used as a body soap they leave behind a pleasant perfume on the skin[K]. The developing seed cases are also a very good source of saponins[K].
Cultivation details
Landscape Uses:Border, Container, Foundation, Pest tolerant, Hedge, Massing, Rock garden, Screen. Prefers a warm sunny position but tolerates light shade[11, 200]. Tolerates some lime, but will not succeed on shallow chalk[200]. Plants are hardy to about -10°c[200], they succeed in the open in the milder parts of the country but are best grown by a sunny wall in colder areas[11]. This is one of the hardiest and most satisfactory of the evergreen members of the genus in Britain[11]. It is a fast-growing species that can flower in 2 years from seed[200]. The cultivar 'Puget Blue' is very vigorous and flowers freely, though it is likely to be of hybrid origin. This species is closely related to C. dentatus[11]. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[200]. Plants dislike root disturbance, they should be planted out into their permanent positions whilst still small[182]. Dislikes heavy pruning, it is best not to cut out any wood thicker than a pencil[182]. Some members of this genus have a symbiotic relationship with certain soil micro-organisms, these form nodules on the roots of the plants and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200, 212]. Special Features:North American native, Blooms are very showy.
Propagation
Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed should be pre-soaked for 12 hours in warm water and then given 1 - 3 months stratification at 1°c[138, 200]. Germination usually takes place in 1 - 2 months at 20°c[138]. One report says that the seed is best given boiling water treatment, or heated in 4 times its volume of sand at 90 - 120°c for 4 - 5 minutes and then soaked in warm water for 12 hours before sowing it[214]. The seed exhibits considerable longevity, when stored for 15 years in an air-tight dry container at 1 - 5°c it has shown little deterioration in viability[214]. The seed is ejected from its capsule with some force when fully ripe, timing the collection of seed can be difficult because unless collected just prior to dehiscence the seed is difficult to extract and rarely germinates satisfactorily[214]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, taken at a node[200], July/August in a frame[11]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, 7 - 12 cm with a heel, October in a cold frame[78]. The roots are quite brittle and it is best to pot up the callused cuttings in spring, just before the roots break[78]. Good percentage.
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Ceanothus americanusNew Jersey Tea, Wild Snowball33
Ceanothus arboreusCatalina Mountain Lilac, Feltleaf ceanothus00
Ceanothus cuneatusBuckbrush, Sedgeleaf buckbrush, Monterey ceanothus21
Ceanothus divergensCropleaf Ceanothus, Calistoga ceanothus00
Ceanothus fendleriFendler's Ceanothus21
Ceanothus integerrimusDeer Brush21
Ceanothus maritimusMaritime Ceanothus00
Ceanothus ovatusSmaller Red-Root21
Ceanothus prostratusSquaw Carpet, Prostrate ceanothus00
Ceanothus purpureusHollyleaf Ceanothus00
Ceanothus sanguineusOregon Tea Tree, Redstem ceanothus21
Ceanothus species 00
Ceanothus thyrsiflorusBlue Brush, Blueblossom00
Ceanothus velutinusSticky Laurel, Snowbrush ceanothus, Hooker's ceanothus22
Plant Suppliers: Click here for a List

      You can download this page as a PDF

Expert comment
 
Author
Trel.
Botanical References
11200
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
Marty Thu Aug 24 2006
I live in the Midest U.S. and saw what I think is this shrub in Avebury, England when I was visiting this summer. Does anyone know where I could purchase this extraordinary plant?
Elizabeth H.
norman duckworth Wed Jun 3 2009
where can I purchase ceonothus
Elizabeth H.
norrie duckworth Thu Jun 4 2009
very interesting ,still need to know where it can be bought regards norrie
pascal D.
Jun 11 2013 12:00AM
Beside fixing nitrogen, it attracts an incredible crowd of insects during the flowering period. In central France.
QR Code

What's this?

This is a QR code (short for Quick Response) which gives fast-track access to our website pages. QR Codes are barcodes that can be read by mobile phone (smartphone) cameras. This QR Code is unique to this page. All plant pages have their own unique code. For more information about QR Codes click here.

1. Copy and print the QR code to a plant label, poster, book, website, magazines, newspaper etc and even t-shirts.
2. Smartphone users scan the QR Code which automatically takes them to the webpage the QR Code came from.
3. Smartphone users quickly have information on a plant directly for the pfaf.org website on their phone.
Add a comment/link

If you have important information about this plant that may help other users please add a comment or link below. Only comments or links that are felt to be directly relevant to a plant will be included. If you think a comment/link or information contained on this page is inaccurate or misleading we would welcome your feedback at admin@pfaf.org. If you have questions about a plant please use the Forum on this website as we do not have the resources to answer questions ourselves.

* Please note: the comments by website users are not necessarily those held by PFAF and may give misleading or inaccurate information.

Subject : Ceanothus impressus  

Plant Uses

Edible Uses
Medicinal Uses
Other Plant uses
Woodland Gardening
Why Perennial Plants?
Top Edible Plants
Top Medicinal Plants
Garden Design
Habitats
Translations

Content

Content Help
Bookshop
Support Us
Blog
Links
Old Database Search
Suppliers
Contact
About Us
News
Sign In

PFAF Newsletter

Stay informed about PFAFs progress,
challenges and hopes by signing up for
our free email newsletter. You will receive
a range of benefits including:
* Important announcements and news
* Exclusive content not on the website
* Updates on new information &
functionality of the website & database

We will not sell or share your email address.
You can unsubscribe at anytime.