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Rubus idaeus - L.
                 
Common Name Raspberry, American red raspberry, Grayleaf red raspberry
Family Rosaceae
USDA hardiness 4-7
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Moist neglected land, hedgerows and woodland edges[7, 11, 244].
Range Europe, including Britain, from Iceland south and east to Spain and temperate Asia.
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary
Bloom Color: Green, Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Form: Spreading or horizontal, Upright or erect.

Rubus idaeus Raspberry, American red raspberry, Grayleaf red raspberry


Rubus idaeus Raspberry, American red raspberry, Grayleaf red raspberry
   
Physical Characteristics
 icon of manicon of shrub
Rubus idaeus is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2 m (6ft) by 1.5 m (5ft) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 3 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf 11-Apr It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, self.The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms

Habitats
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Fruit;  Root;  Stem.
Edible Uses: Coffee;  Tea.

Fruit - raw or cooked[2, 5, 7, 61]. Delicious when eaten out of hand, the fruit is also used in pies, preserves etc[183]. Root - cooked. The root, which should be neither too young nor too old, requires a lot of boiling[7]. Young shoots - peeled and eaten raw or cooked like asparagus[172]. They are harvested as they emerge through the ground in the spring and whilst they are still tender. A herb tea is made from the dried leaves[21, 46, 183]. Another report says that a type of tea made from raspberry and blackberry leaves is an excellent coffee substitute[7].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antiinflammatory;  Astringent;  Birthing aid;  Cardiac;  Decongestant;  Oxytoxic.

Antiemetic[13, 165]. The leaves and roots are anti-inflammatory, astringent, decongestant, ophthalmic, oxytocic and stimulant[4, 13, 165, 222, 254]. A tea made from them is used in the treatment of diarrhoea, as a tonic for the uterus to strengthen pregnant women, and as an aid in childbirth[4, 222, 257]. The tea has also been shown as effective in relieving painful menstrual cramps[222]. The active ingredients both stimulate and relax the uterus[222]. They can be used during the last three months of pregnancy and during childbirth, but should not be used earlier[238]. Externally, the leaves and roots are used as a gargle to treat tonsillitis and mouth inflammations, as a poultice and wash to treat sores, conjunctivitis, minor wounds, burns and varicose ulcers[238, 257]. The leaves are harvested in the summer and dried for later use[9]. The fruit is antiscorbutic and diuretic[7]. Fresh raspberry juice, mixed with a little honey, makes an excellent refrigerant beverage to be taken in the heat of a fever[21]. Made into a syrup, it is said to have a beneficial effect on the heart[21].
Other Uses
Cosmetic;  Dye;  Paper.

A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit[168]. A fibre obtained from the stems is used in making paper[189]. The stems are harvested in the summer after the fruit has been eaten, the leaves are removed and the stems are steamed until the fibres can be stripped. The fibres are cooked for 2 hours with lye and then hand beaten with mallets or ball milled for 3 hours. The paper is light brown in colour[189]. A decongestant face-mask made from the fruit is used cosmetically to soothe reddened skin[7].
Cultivation details
Landscape Uses:Erosion control, Foundation, Ground cover, Massing, Rock garden, Seashore. Prefers a good deep well-drained loamy soil on the acid side[1, 34]. Dislikes very heavy soils[1, 200], light soils[4] and alkaline soils[200]. Prefers an open position but tolerates some shade[1]. Plants crop less well when grown in the shade of trees though they do well in the open on a north-facing slope[200]. Requires a position sheltered from strong winds[200]. Prefers a pH between 6 and 6.5[200]. Raspberries are frequently cultivated in temperate regions of the world, both in the garden and commercially, for their edible fruit. There are many named varieties able to supply fresh fruit from mid-summer to the autumn[1, 200]. High costs of picking the fruit means that little is actually sold fresh, most of the commercially cultivated crops either being used for preserves or grown for the 'Pick Your Own' trade. All the cultivars are self-fertile[200]. This species has biennial stems, it produces a number of new stems each year from the perennial rootstock, these stems fruit in their second year and then die[200]. It is best not to grow raspberries near blackberries or potatoes[18]. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus[200]. Special Features: Not North American native, Attracts butterflies, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.
Propagation
Seed - requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame[200]. Tip layering in July. Plant out in autumn. Division in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn[200].
Other Names
Found In
Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status
IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :
Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Actinidia rubus 30
Rubus abbreviansVermont blackberry30
Rubus acaulisDwarf Raspberry31
Rubus acer 10
Rubus adenophorus 20
Rubus adenotrichusMora Comun20
Rubus affinis 20
Rubus alexeterius 20
Rubus allegheniensisAlleghany Blackberry, Graves' blackberry32
Rubus almusMayes Dewberry, Garden dewberry30
Rubus amabilis 30
Rubus ampelinus 20
Rubus arcticusArctic Bramble, Arctic raspberry, Dwarf raspberry50
Rubus argutusHighbush Blackberry, Sawtooth blackberry21
Rubus arizonicusArizona Dewberry20
Rubus australis 20
Rubus avipes 20
Rubus baileyanusBailey's dewberry20
Rubus barbatus 20
Rubus bellobatusKittatinny Blackberry20
Rubus biflorus 30
Rubus bifronsHimalayan berry, Hybrid European blackberry, Hybrid blackberry10
Rubus bloxamii 20
Rubus buergeri 20
Rubus caesiusDewberry, European dewberry20
Rubus calycinusWild Raspberry10
Rubus canadensisAmerican Dewberry, Smooth blackberry41
Rubus candicans 20
Rubus caucasicus 20
Rubus caudatus 20
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Expert comment
 
Author
L.
Botanical References
1117200
Links / References
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment
 
Elizabeth H.
Sarah Jumel Fri Feb 2 2007
People wanting to grow this in warmer climates can try Caroline, Dinkum, and Autumn Bliss. All fruited (in containers) for me in New Orleans.
Elizabeth H.
Boris Wed Jun 20 2007
You can eat the young leaves - raw or cooked -, too.
Elizabeth H.
Veronica Mon Jun 8 2009
This is the only remedy (pharmaceuticals included)that has ever eased my menstrual cramps in over 25 years.
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Subject : Rubus idaeus  

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