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Elaeagnus cordifolia - .                
                 
Common Name
Family Elaeagnaceae
Synonyms
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Not known
Range E. Asia.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Well drained soil Moist Soil Full shade Semi-shade Full sun

Summary       

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of shrub
Elaeagnus cordifolia is an evergreen Shrub growing to 4 m (13ft) by 4 m (13ft) at a medium rate.
It is not frost tender. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Oct to November, and the seeds ripen in May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.It can fix Nitrogen.


USDA hardiness zone : Coming soon


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Elaeagnus cordifolia


Elaeagnus cordifolia
   
Habitats       
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; Shady Edge; not Deep Shade; Hedge;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts: Fruit;  Seed.
Edible Uses:

Fruit - raw or cooked. The fruit must be fully ripe before it develops its full flavour, prior to that it is acid and somewhat astringent[K]. The oval fruit is up to 20mm long and 14mm wide, it contains a single large seed[K]. Seed - raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous[K].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Cancer.

The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers[214].
Other Uses
Hedge;  Hedge.

Plants can be grown as a hedge in exposed positions, tolerating maritime exposure. They form a good wind-break, though they are somewhat slow to reach an effective size[K]. They succeed when planted under trees that have become bare at the base, in time they will scramble up into the tree and fill out the bottom[29].
Cultivation details                                         
We have very little specific information on this species and are not sure that this is the correct name for it. It is based on a name given to us by Probus gardens in Cornwall where a specimen is being grown. This plant, which is near to E. glabra, has a larger fruit than other members of the genus and ripens a week or two earlier, usually in mid April in Cornwall. Succeeds in most soils that are well-drained[200]. Prefers a soil that is only moderately fertile, succeeding in poor soils and dry soils[11, 200]. Requires a lime-free soil[219]. A very shade tolerant plant, it can be grown under other trees and will eventually climb up into them[29, 166]. Plants are not reliably hardy in the colder areas of the country[200]. This species has a superb potential as a commercial fruit crop in temperate areas. It ripens its fruit in mid spring, well before any other fruit crops, yields are usually good to excellent and the fruit is of a good size with a reasonable flavour[K]. Some research needs to be carried out to determine the best conditions for ensuring good yields every year and also the mechanism of fertilization[K]. This species is notably resistant to honey fungus[88, 200]. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200]. An excellent companion plant, when grown in orchards it can increase yields from the fruit trees by up to 10%. The small flowers are deliciously scented, their aroma pervading the garden on calm days[K].
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame[78]. It should germinate freely within 4 weeks, though it may take 18 months[K]. Stored seed can be very slow to germinate, often taking more than 18 months. A warm stratification for 4 weeks followed by 12 weeks cold stratification can help[98]. The seed usually (eventually) germinates quite well[78]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pot as soon as they are large enough to handle and plant out when they are at least 15cm tall. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Good percentage[78]. It is best to take the cuttings in June[202]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, 10 - 12cm with a heel, November in a frame. Leave for 12 months. Fair to good percentage[78]. Layering in September/October. Takes 12 months[78].
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

  [K] Ken Fern Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.

[11]Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement.
A classic with a wealth of information on the plants, but poor on pictures.
[29]Shepherd. F.W. Hedges and Screens.
A small but informative booklet giving details of all the hedging plants being grown in the R.H.S. gardens at Wisley in Surrey.
[78]Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers.
A bit dated but a good book on propagation techniques with specific details for a wide range of plants.
[88]RHS. The Garden. Volume 112.
Snippets of information from the magazine of the RHS. In particular, there are articles on plants that are resistant to honey fungus, oriental vegetables, Cimicifuga spp, Passiflora species and Cucurbits.
[98]Gordon. A. G. and Rowe. D. C. f. Seed Manual for Ornamental Trees and Shrubs.
Very comprehensive guide to growing trees and shrubs from seed. Not for the casual reader.
[166]Taylor. J. The Milder Garden.
A good book on plants that you didn't know could be grown outdoors in Britain.
[200]Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
[202]Davis. B. Climbers and Wall Shrubs.
Contains information on 2,000 species and cultivars, giving details of cultivation requirements. The text is terse but informative.
[214]Matthews. V. The New Plantsman. Volume 1, 1994.
A quarterly magazine, it has articles on Himalayacalamus hookerianus, hardy Euphorbias and an excellent article on Hippophae spp.
[219]Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls
A nice little book about plants for growing against walls and a small section on plants that can grow in walls.

Readers comment                                         
 
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Subject : Elaeagnus cordifolia  
             

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