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Abelia triflora - R.Br. ex Wall.                
                 
Common Name Indian Abelia
Family Caprifoliaceae
Synonyms Zabelia triflora. (Wallich.)Makino.
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Dry scrub and rocky slopes in calcareous soils, 1200 - 4200 metres in Uttar Pradesh[146, 158].
Range E. Asia - N.W. Himalayas
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary       

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of shrub
Abelia triflora is a deciduous Shrub growing to 3.5 m (11ft) by 3 m (9ft) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 6. It is in flower in June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)

USDA hardiness zone : 5-9


Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils. Suitable pH: neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Abelia triflora Indian Abelia


Abelia triflora Indian Abelia
   
Habitats       
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses                                         
None known
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known
Other Uses
Wood - hard, close and even-grained. Used for walking sticks[146, 158].
Cultivation details                                         
Requires a well-drained open loamy soil[11] in a warm, sheltered sunny position[200, 245]. Plants are best grown in semi-shade[219]. They are intolerant of water-logging[200] and of dry soils[219]. Succeeds in any soil but new growth is less vigorous in dry soils[202]. One report says that the plant likes a soil with a high chalk content[245], though another says that chlorosis occurs on very alkaline soils[202]. This species is hardy to about -15°c[184], it grows well in the open at Kew[11]. A fairly slow-growing plant, it is shy to flower in British gardens unless placed against a sunny wall[219]. It flowers on wood that is 2 - 3 years old or older[182]. Another report says that the plant flowers on the new wood[219], whilst another says that it flowers on terminal clusters[245]. Any pruning is best done immediately after flowering by thinning out the old wood.[182, 219]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200], Closely related to A buddleioides and A. umbellata[182]. The flowers are wonderfully scented[182], with the fragrance of vanilla[245].
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - we have no specific information for this plant, but suggest sowing the seed in early spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 -10cm with a slight heel, July in pots of sandy soil in a frame[11]. Takes 3 - 4 weeks. Very easy, a good percentage of the cuttings root[78]. Cuttings of mature wood, 7 - 10cm with a heel if possible, November in a cold frame. High percentage[78]. Layering young shoots[245].
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
R.Br. ex Wall.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
11200
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

[11]Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement.
A classic with a wealth of information on the plants, but poor on pictures.
[78]Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers.
A bit dated but a good book on propagation techniques with specific details for a wide range of plants.
[146]Gamble. J. S. A Manual of Indian Timbers.
Written last century, but still a classic, giving a lot of information on the uses and habitats of Indian trees. Not for the casual reader.
[158]Gupta. B. L. Forest Flora of Chakrata, Dehra Dun and Saharanpur.
A good flora for the middle Himalayan forests, sparsly illustrated. Not really for the casual reader.
[182]Thomas. G. S. Ornamental Shrubs, Climbers and Bamboos.
Contains a wide range of plants with a brief description, mainly of their ornamental value but also usually of cultivation details and varieties.
[184]Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Shrubs.
Excellent photographs and a terse description of 1900 species and cultivars.
[200]Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
[202]Davis. B. Climbers and Wall Shrubs.
Contains information on 2,000 species and cultivars, giving details of cultivation requirements. The text is terse but informative.
[219]Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls
A nice little book about plants for growing against walls and a small section on plants that can grow in walls.
[245]Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World.
An excellent, comprehensive book on scented plants giving a few other plant uses and brief cultivation details. There are no illustrations.
[11]Bill Mollison Introduction to Permaculture

Readers comment                                         
 
Elizabeth H.
Rayudin Kamarudin Fri Oct 16 2009

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Trevor P.
Feb 25 2010 12:00AM
This is test comments for this plant.
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Mar 14 2010 12:00AM
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